Cada rama del servicio tiene su propio sistema individual de las puntuaciones ASVAB. Los reclutadores y consejeros de empleos militares utilizan estas puntuaciones, junto con otros factores como la disponibilidad de empleos, la elegibilidad autorización de seguridad, calificaciones médicas, y la fuerza física, para que coincida con los reclutas potenciales con empleos militares.
Las puntuaciones compuestas (puntuaciones de línea): Las puntuaciones compuestas se calculan de forma individual por cada rama de servicio. Cada rama tiene su propio sistema particular al compilar varios puntuaciones estándar en puntajes compuestos individuales. Estas puntuaciones son utilizados por las diferentes ramas para determinar las cualificaciones laborales.
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In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
A lot of people see the “CAT” term attached to the ASVAB test when they first start looking into the test and aren’t sure what that stands for. This term is an acronym and it stands for “Computerized Adaptive Test”. There are three different versions of the ASVAB test. The CAT is available at military processing stations for enlisting soldiers. The pencil and paper (also known as the P&P or S-ASVAB) version of the test is available for high school and college students who may not actually enlist. The third type of ASVAB test is the MET-ASVAB, or Mobile Examination Test, which is available only for enlisted soldiers at mobile testing centers (this test is also done with paper and pencil).
The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.
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