The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
The scores from the Word Knowledge, Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge, and Paragraph Comprehension are combined together and known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Your AFQT scores represent a percentile between 1 and 99 and measure your ranking compared to scores from other 18 to 23 year olds. If you score a 70 on your AFQT, this implies that you scored better than 70% of test takers. Your scores on the other six ASVAB tests will help identify which jobs may be appropriate for you in the military.

Por ejemplo, si recibe una puntuación percentil de 72, se puede decir que su puntaje es tan bien o mejor que 72 de 100 del grupo de la norma que tomaron el examen. (Y, por cierto, esta estadística a partir de 1997 no es un error tipográfico. El ASVAB última " re-normado " en 2004, y el grupo de la muestra utilizada para la norma era esa gente que tomaron el examen en 1997.)
The various armed forces adopted all of those aspects in 1976. At that point in time, the test was in its written form rather than today’s more common form (computerized test format). The written form covers all of the previously mentioned areas as well, which is why both forms are still available. All-in-all that answers the question concerning the intention of the test.
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