The Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a test all enlisted candidates must take with the recruiter during the enlistment process. It is typically taken in the office on the computer in a shortened format. Then you will take the full ASVAB again at Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) on the day you swear into the Delayed Entry Program (DEP). The test is actually multiple subtests and graded with an overall percentile score – not percentage score. In other words, you are ranked accordingly with other recruits and by a percentage that you got correct.

The CAT-ASVAB is an adaptive test which means the test adapts to the ability of the test-taker. It is possible to administer a shorter test this way than with the pencil and paper test. When you complete a subsection of the test, you can then move onto the next section of the test without having to wait for an administrator. Subsections are still timed however and on average it takes about 1 ½ hours to complete the computer ASVAB.
After adopting the test in 1976 the test became a way of indicating whether or not an individual was 100% qualified to serve. As previously mentioned this aptitude test has a colorful history. That is because it underwent a dramatic change in 2002 and another dramatic change in 2004. The change that occurred in 2002 expanded the categories of the test and the overall difficulty. This can be seen by the addition of all of the diverse categories below:
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