There are essentially two options when it comes to preparing for this test. First, a person can attempt to reassess all of the information that they learned over a decade by spending hours compiling information. Secondly, a person can find a specially formatted ASVAB practice test that covers all areas of both the written test and computerized test. Clearly, the best choice is the ASVAB practice test. The question becomes “Where does one find an accurate ASVAB practice test?”
Developed for students trying to score well on the ASVAB, this comprehensive study guide includes: -Word Kwledge Test Review -Paragraph Comprehension Test Review -Arithmetic Reasoning and Mathematics Kwledge Review -General Science Test Review -Assembling Objects Test Review -Mechanical Comprehension Test Review -One ASVAB Practice Test Plus 2 Additional AFQT Practice Tests -Detailed Answer Explanations for the Practice Questions -Test Taking Strategies Each section review goes into detail to cover all of the content likely to appear on the ASVAB. The ASVAB practice tests were designed to be as close as possible to the real test questions that you will face on test day. There are 185 questions on the main ASVAB practice test and 105 in each of the two bonus AFQT practice tests. This is a total of almost 400 ASVAB practice questions to help get you ready for your exam. The practice exams are each followed by detailed answer explanations. If you miss a question on the practice exam, it's important that you are able to understand the nature of your mistake and how to avoid making it again in the future. The answer explanations will help you to learn from your mistakes and overcome them. Understanding the latest test taking strategies is essential to preparing you for what you will expect on the exam. A test taker has to t only understand the material that is being covered on the test, but also must be familiar with the strategies that are necessary to properly utilize the time provided and get through the test without making any avoidable errors. Anyone planning to take the ASVAB should take advantage of the review material, practice tests, and test taking strategies contained in this study guide.
The Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a test all enlisted candidates must take with the recruiter during the enlistment process. It is typically taken in the office on the computer in a shortened format. Then you will take the full ASVAB again at Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) on the day you swear into the Delayed Entry Program (DEP). The test is actually multiple subtests and graded with an overall percentile score – not percentage score. In other words, you are ranked accordingly with other recruits and by a percentage that you got correct.
The vast majority of ASVAB test takers will ultimately not enlist in the military. The ASVAB Career Exploration Program claims that only two-and-a-half percent of those who participate in the ASVAB join the military. Forty-seven percent of those who take the exam indicate an interest in attending a four-year college, and 16 percent of those who take the exam originally indicate some kind of an interest in joining the military.
The paper-and-pencil version of the test administered at a Mobile Examination Test (MET) site usually takes 3–4 hours. The time needed to take the CAT-ASVAB test can vary. The test is adaptive. If the candidates answer a question correctly, they are given one of increasing difficulty. If the candidates miss a question, they are subsequently given an easier item. This pattern continues until the test is finished. Because of its adaptive nature, the CAT-ASVAB test generally takes about half the time of the paper-and-pencil version.
The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.
×