For almost a century, the U.S. military has been a pioneer in the field of using aptitude tests to evaluate an individual’s potential for service. The organization also uses the test to determine aptitude for various military occupational specialties (MOS). The use of aptitude tests began during World War I. While the group-administered Army Alpha test measured verbal and numerical ability as well as general knowledge, the Army Beta test was used to evaluate illiterate, unschooled and non-English speaking volunteers and draftees. The Army and Navy General Classifications Tests replaced the Alpha and Beta tests as a means to measure cognitive ability during World War II. The results of these tests, as well as additional classification exams, were used to assign recruits to a particular MOS.
If you are interested in taking the ASVAB in order to apply for the military, you will need to contact a military recruiter. To find a recruiter near you, go to http://www.todaysmilitary.com/ and click on “Request More Info.” When the recruiter has determined that you are otherwise qualified, he/she will set up a time for you to take the ASVAB at the closest Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) or an affiliated Military Entrance Test (MET) site.
Quienes no viven cerca de un MEPS pueden realizar el examen (por lo general con lápiz y papel) en una ubicación satelital llamada centro MET (Prueba de Entrada a las Fuerzas Armadas, por sus siglas en inglés). Todos los reclutas militares deben realizar el ASVAB, incluso si ya realizaron el ASVAB CEP en la escuela secundaria. El ASVAB que se realiza en el MEPS añade una sección llamada Ensamblaje de objetos, con un total de nueve asignaturas.

The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.

The Assembling Objects section of the ASVAB practice test measures your ability to determine how an object will look when its parts are put together. You will be shown an illustration of pieces and asked to choose which one, among a selection of finished diagrams, shows how they fit together. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 16 minutes, while the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 15 minutes.

tienda nike air max 90 ultra 2 0 si online But it failed in December, with the mileage at about 67,000, as he tried to merge onto a busy highway. MISSILES SOON; Rome Says Some IRBM's Are Due by End of the Year Left Wingers ProtestWealthy Argentine, 76, Weds Japanese After 3 Hour Chat Through InterpretersNorse Premier in BelgradeDillon Meets Greek Premier30 SOCCER PLAYERS EXPELLED IN SOVIETCIVIL DEFENSE DRILL HELD IN 5 BOROUGHSART OF 37 NATIONS TO BE SHOWN HEREU.
La Academia de Suboficiales de la Fuerza Aérea Superior realizó un estudio en profundidad de varios de opción múltiple resultados de las pruebas de la Fuerza Aérea tomadas durante varios años. Se encontró que cuando los estudiantes cambian sus respuestas en la hoja de respuestas, cambiaron de un derecho a una respuesta incorrecta más de 72 por ciento de las veces! El primer instinto de los estudiantes era la correcta.
High school and postsecondary students can also take the ASVAB test as part of the Department of Defense’s Career Exploration Program. This paper-and-pencil version of the test is the same as the paper-and-pencil enlistment version but excludes the Assembling Objects section. It is intended to help those students considering a career in the military to discover their strengths in both military and civilian jobs. If the student scores high enough in the AFQT section of the test, he may use the score to enlist within the two-year expiration window.

The Electronics Information section of the practice test gauges your knowledge of electrical equipment and parts, including circuits, currents, batteries, and resistors. An example may be, “Because solid state diodes have no filament, they: don’t work, are less efficient than tubes, require less operating power, or require more operating power?” The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 8 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 20 questions in 9 minutes.

The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.

×