The ASVAB is administered at a Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS). If there is not a MEPS near you, you may take the ASVAB at a satellite location called a Military Entrance Test (MET) site. There are two formats of the ASVAB: computer-administered test (CAT) and paper and pencil (P&P). All MEPS administer the CAT-ASVAB, while MET sites administer the P&P ASVAB.
ASVAB stands for Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. It is a test that was originally established in 1968 to measure and predict the success of an applicant in various academic and occupational pursuits in the military. High school and post-secondary students and adults take the test more than one million times each year. If you’re interested in joining the military, or if you already have and would like to take a sample test, simply navigate through the ten practice test sections and take whichever tests you’d like as often as you’d like.

Note: the Numerical Operations and Coding Speed sub-tests were eliminated from the ASVAB in 2002 and 2003. To compensate for these missing values, and to keep the Administrative Composite equal to those who took the ASVAB prior to the change, the Air Force loads a "dummy score" in place of the NO and CS sub-test scores for those who take the ASVAB after the change. The "dummy scores" used as replacement values are the average scores received on these two sub-tests from Air Force applicants for the 12-month period prior to the change.


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The test is part of the larger ASVAB Career Exploration Program. The Program uses the test to help students identify both their interests as well as their strengths in three skills areas (verbal, math, and science and technical skills). Based on a student's skill levels, information is provided about more than 400 occupations in order to enable students and parents to judge their potential success in areas that interest them the most. Schools that may be facing budget cuts or finding themselves with limited resources devoted to career counseling are encouraged to find out whether using the ASVAB Program would be useful, as the testing and career development services are free of charge.
The scores from the other tests are used to determine what type of specialty you might be best suited for.  These "composite" scores (also known as line scores, MOS scores, or aptitude area scores) are calculated by adding together combinations of the different sub test standard scores. These composite scores are then used to determine which different military jobs (aka Military Occupational Specialties or MOS) may be the best fit for you.  Each branch of the military will have their own approach to these composite scores.
The various armed forces adopted all of those aspects in 1976. At that point in time, the test was in its written form rather than today’s more common form (computerized test format). The written form covers all of the previously mentioned areas as well, which is why both forms are still available. All-in-all that answers the question concerning the intention of the test.
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