The ASVAB is a multiple choice test and is broken down into eight areas. Each section has its own score, and are combined to come up with your composite score. It’s scored on a percentile basis, so 99 is the highest possible score. Different branches of the military will have different minimum composite scores, and those will vary within each branch by different job. The higher you score, the more jobs and options you’ll qualify for. If you don’t take it in high school, you’ll take the test at your nearest Military Entrance Processing Station, or at an armory or recruiting station. It’s timed, and it takes about three and a half hours to complete.
Though you may be intimidated by studying 5-7 nights a week, remember that this is only for a few months. The investment you make now in yourself can have great rewards - IF you put in the time! Just be honest with yourself, find out what you need to work on the most, and stick with your schedule! You may also want to set goals, such as "I want to take a practice test and score 80% or better on it within a month." However you choose to study, be consistent, be confident, and you will be successful!
Like other military aptitude tests, the ASVAB measures general knowledge from a wide range of categories which can make studying for it seem hopeless at times. Fortunately there are a number of books and study guides out there to help you do well and increase your score. Although this list isn't comprehensive it does include the most helpful and relevant study guides available for succeeding on the ASVAB and, by extension, allowing you to start your career serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. 

The military has used the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) for the last 40 years to place soldiers into careers and to determine whether or not a soldier could follow directions and be trained. The military says the ASVAB is a useful measure of future academic and occupational success in the military -- if a solider can read it. Testers must understand the ASVAB’s long list of abbreviations if the test itself is to be used to its best advantage.


Like other military aptitude tests, the ASVAB measures general knowledge from a wide range of categories which can make studying for it seem hopeless at times. Fortunately there are a number of books and study guides out there to help you do well and increase your score. Although this list isn't comprehensive it does include the most helpful and relevant study guides available for succeeding on the ASVAB and, by extension, allowing you to start your career serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. 


Detailed answer explanations are also included for each question. It may sound obvious, but you have to know which questions you missed (and more importantly why you missed them) to be able to avoid making the same mistakes again when you take the real test. That's why our ASVAB Practice Questions include answer keys with detailed answer explanations. These in-depth answer explanations will allow you to better understand any questions that were difficult for you or that you needed more help to understand.
Our ASVAB practice test questions are categorized to help you focus your study. Just like in the real exam, each of our questions will have four possible answers to choose from. The questions are similar to what you can expect on the actual ASVAB exam. After you submit answers to the practice questions, a test score will be presented. In addition, you will be given rationales (explanations) to all of the questions to help you understand any questions you may have gotten wrong.

The CAT-ASVAB is a multiple choice computer test consisting of ten subtests totaling 145 questions with an allotted time of 153 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours. The test will be adaptive meaning each question will be adapted to the skill level of the examinee based on their previous answers. The overwhelming majority of those, currently in the military, took the CAT-ASVAB. The table below provides a breakdown for the CAT-ASVAB:
Your success on ASVAB test day depends not only on how many hours you put into preparing, but also on whether you prepared the right way. It’s good to check along the way to see whether your studying is paying off. One of the most effective ways to do this is by taking ASVAB practice tests to evaluate your progress. Practice tests are useful because they show exactly where you need to improve. Every time you take a ASVAB practice test, pay special attention to these three groups of questions:
You’ll find a great practice test and lots of other information about the ASVAB at the Department of Defense's ASVAB Career Exploration Program site (ASVABprogram.com). Since your test scores can have an impact on your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS)—and whether or not you can attend certain special schools (like Airborne school, Sniper school and many others)—we recommend you make the most of these additional resources.
The Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB test, is required of all people trying to enlist in the United States military service (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps) or the United States Coast Guard. This multiple-choice test is divided into eight subtests to assess individual subject area strengths and weaknesses. Passing (being admitted to the branch of service) is determined by a combination of ASVAB score and if the future enlistee has graduated from high school or has a GED (General Educational Development series of tests). Enlistees must also pass the ASVAB with a certain scores for each subtest to be eligible to obtain certain jobs within the service.
Both you and your counselor will receive a copy of the results. Before you take the ASVAB, you will be asked to sign a statement authorizing the Department of Defense to score your test and return your results to your school. Each school determines if it will release your scores to the military services. If you are a junior, a senior, or a postsecondary school student, a recruiter may contact you. This can occur whether or not you take the ASVAB.
PiCAT testing does require a shorter “verification test” for new recruits. This is in the form of a short, proctored test that lasts about a half an hour. Depending on circumstances, recruits may be required to take this verification test at a Military Entrance Processing Station, or within 30 days of taking PiCAT if the recruit is not going to MEPS right away. Those who do not pass the verification test will be required to take the ASVAB.
The ASVAB is taken in two different forms, computerized and written. Even so they test the same information. The sections are as follows, General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and a Verbal Expression score influenced by the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension sections of the test. Those looking to join the Navy also complete a Coding Speed test.
To enlist in the Air Force, which is considered the most restrictive branch of the military when it comes to AFQT scores, you must have a minimum AFQT score of 36 if you have a high school school diploma. If you have a GED, you must score a minimum of 65. Less than1 percent of people who enlist in the Air Force each year have a GED instead of a high school diploma. In rare cases, the Air Force will accept a minimum score of 31, if an applicant has a special skill that the Air Force deems necessary, such as speaking a particular foreign language. Again, like in any branch of the military, your score not only determines your ability to enlist, it also determines your qualification of the various jobs within that branch.
The Paragraph Comprehension section of the test measures your ability to read a passage and interpret the information contained within it. You may read a selection and be asked to interpret the author’s purpose, or what a particular word in the passage means, based on the context of the sentence where it appears. To help you better prepare for the exam, the Paragraph Comprehension section of the ASVAB practice test has passages of similar length and style to those on the actual ASVAB test. The CAT-ASVAB test has 11 questions in 22 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 15 questions in 13 minutes.

The military offers boundless opportunities for people looking for a career in serving their country. The five branches of the military (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard) all have active, reserve, and guard units with jobs unique to each branch and level of commitment. Examples of different jobs include military police, telephone technician, psychological operations specialist, journalist, dental specialist, and oboe player. Each job allows for different levels of advancement depending on factors such as job performance and length of service.
Current deployments Conflicts Wars Timeline History: A MC N AF CG Colonial World War II Civil affairs Officers' clubs African Americans Asian Americans Buddhist Americans Jewish Americans Muslim Americans Pakistani Americans Sikh Americans Historiography: Army Center of Military History MC History Division Naval History and Heritage Command Air Force Historical Research Agency American official war artists: Army Art Program AF Art Program
Every single individual that wishes to serve this country is without a doubt a brave person that deserves respect. These practice tests are offered because everyone wants to see these soldiers follow their dreams. Additionally, the nation as a whole firmly believe that those honorable individuals should not be held back because of their inability to recall some pieces of information. This nation does not just dream about making a difference.
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