Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.
Line scores, which are also known as composite scores, may be used to determine if an applicant would be a good fit for specific careers in a branch of the military. For example, an acceptable Skilled Technical (ST) score may be required for some positions in the Army. The ST score is determined by an individual's scores on the Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), General Science (GS), Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK) subtests of the ASVAB.

The paper version of the ASVAB is similar to the CAT-ASVAB, but with a few notable differences. The difficulty of the tests are the same; however, the auto and shop information subtests are combined into one section, and the amount of questions and the time available for the subtests are different. On the paper version you will have 149 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours, to complete 225 questions. The table below provides a breakdown for the Paper & Pencil ASVAB:
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is the most widely used multiple-aptitude test battery in the world. As an aptitude test, the ASVAB measures your strengths, weaknesses, and potential for future success. The ASVAB also provides you with career information for various civilian and military occupations and is an indicator for success in future endeavors whether you choose to go to college, vocational school, or a military career.
As you go along, keep in mind that the ASVAB practice test is just that: practice. Memorizing these questions and answers will not be very helpful on the actual test because it is unlikely to have any of the same exact questions. If you only know the right answers to the sample questions, you won’t be prepared for the real thing. Study the concepts until you understand them fully, and then you’ll be able to answer any question that shows up on the test.

You can take the test as a junior or senior in high school and use the score to enlist, provided that you are at least 17 years old and took the test no earlier than 2 years before you begin enlistment processing. If you are at least 17, you can take the test at a Military Processing Station (MEP) or a satellite Military Entrance Test (MET) location.
The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.
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