Additionally, many ASVAB practice tests have a section explaining the answer choices. It can be tempting to read the explanation and think that you now have a good understanding of the concept. However, an explanation likely only covers part of the question’s broader context. Even if the explanation makes sense, go back and investigate every concept related to the question until you’re positive you have a thorough understanding.
Again, we must stress that there is no passing or failing score on the exam. The test is a measure of aptitude and provides percentile rankings to indicate your performance compared to other test takers. However, different branches of the military do have minimum score requirements for enlistment. This means that it’s important to make sure you’re prepared for test day, and that’s where a practice test will prove valuable.

The verbal expression (VE) part of the ASVAB is really important. It factors in to not only your AFQT score, but your Line Score. Line Scores are what determine your job qualifications. Your VE score is computed using adding your Word Knowledge (WK) raw score to the Paragraph Comprehension (PC) raw score. It is then converted to a scaled score ranging from 20 to 62.


The ASVAB contains 10 subtests, which are grouped under different qualification areas. The AFQT portion of the test includes Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, and Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. A minimum score of 32 on this portion is required to enlist in the Marine Corp for recruits with a high school diploma, and those with a GED must score 50.
Here at ASVABTutor, we provide comprehensive study guides for each section of the ASVAB test that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery.  The ASVAB exam is a series of multiple-choice questions broken down into 9 subjects with an emphasis on determining your aptitude in four primary areas: Math, Verbal, Science and Technical, and Spatial. 
The review is really streamlined and concept driven. This makes sure that you'll get better results on the test through shorter and more effective preparation time. The prep book really skips over the fluff. Also, the insider tips section really makes this book stand out. These insider tips truly help you to not get tricked by the test makers on exam day. You will not waste time learning things that you do not need to know. Make your study time more efficient!
Other scores that are taken into account: Although, your high school passing scores or GED scores do not technically form a part of the scores, yet they will be taken into account while your application is being evaluated. For example, if you want to be recruited by the Air Force, then you must have a high school diploma (which you have achieved with a high scores) and an percentile score of 65.
Varsity Tutors’ ASVAB Learning Tools can also help you work in groups, if you so choose. They let you post results on social media so others can see how you did. Many people actually share their progress over time and make this an opportunity to help one another; they’ll even compete in practice tests to make them more fun. The ASVAB practice tests provide a sample of the material you’ll be asked to work with on test day. They are structured in a precise, non-intimidating format with honest and detailed feedback. The study process is made simpler and more efficient while also facilitating a more personalized process of studying.

AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1 and 99, and the score is relative: Your AFQT score indicates how well you did compared to the scores of a reference group. For example, if you score 71, that means you scored as well as or better than 71 percent of those in the reference group. If you score 50, your score is exactly average compared to the reference group. According to the Army, about half the population scores at or above 50, and about 16 percent of the population scores at or above 60.
The ASVAB Electronics Information subtest covers electricity principles and electronic devices, including radios, televisions, magnets, motors, transistors and much, much more. For this subtest, you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions when you take the CAT-ASVAB. You will 9 minutes to answer 20 questions on the pencil and paper version of the ASVAB test. The Electronics Information subtest covers a variety of electrical-related subjects including: You will need to know major electrical concepts, including how to use conductors, currents, circuits and insulators, among other things. You’ll also need to know various types of conductors and insulators and how effective they are. And that’s not all, you’ll also need to know different ways electricity can be used, the different types of electrical current and more.

ASVAB for Dummies is our 4th best overall prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation guides. One main positive of this prep book is that there are tons of practice tests. With 7 online practice tests, this preparation guide will give you tons of repetition to be ready for exam day. Practice questions are one of the best ways to learn and the easiest way to improve your weaknesses.
One main shortcoming of this preparation guide is that there are some errors and misprints in the question and answer section. It may be confusing when you think that you got an answer correct but the answer section says that you got it incorrect. This sometimes wastes your time because you go through the question multiple times but then in the end you figure out that you were right all along, but were confused because of the wrong answer given.  Although with this one imperfection, Kaplan ASVAB Premier has many strengths that make it our best value and best overall pick on our list of the top rated prep guides.

Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.

Kaplan ASVAB Premier is our best overall and best value prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation guides. One major strong suit about Kaplan's is that it has a gargantuan amount of practice problems. With over 1,800 practice problems and 6 full-length practice tests, you should never run out of questions to practice with. This repetition will really prepare you for exam day.
Educational Opportunities–More educational opportunities are available than ever before.  Alternatives to traditional education, such as online courses and weekend or evening programs, allow individuals to obtain higher education while working full-time.  New technology, such as live podcasts and streaming videos on demand, make it possible for people to learn at their own pace in their own place.  Education is a lifelong process.  Many people now choose to combine their education with work experience.  For instance, instead of attending a four-year college immediately after high school, some people get a two-year degree in a particular field and then enter the job force.  At some point, they may choose to complete a certificate program or a four-year degree to advance in their chosen field.  Other people choose to enter the Military to take advantage of the educational benefits and training that is provided.  There are a variety of occupations and career paths that you can pursue with different levels of education.  Do not rule out a given career field simply because you think that the educational requirements might be more than what you would like to pursue after high school.
Are you thinking about joining the Army, Navy, Marines, or Air Force?  Maybe you want to cook or write or handle explosives. Maybe you want to deal with advanced technology or pilot a drone. Whatever your military dream job, we can help you turn that dream into reality. Here at ASVABTutor, we provide the practice tests and study guides that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]
×