The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test is used by each branch of the military to determine a military recruit’s aptitude in ten different areas. The ASVAB test helps assign new recruits into career fields they may be well-suited for, but the ASVAB should not be considered an IQ test. It is a multiple-aptitude battery that measures developed abilities and helps predict future academic and occupational success in the military. The ASVAB test is also administered to millions of high school and post-secondary students making it one of the most widely used tests in the world.
Composite Scores are sometimes referred to as “line scores”, “aptitude area scores”, or “MOS scores”. These scores are derived by adding different combinations of the sub test standard scores. Composite scores are used by the different branches of the U.S. Armed Services to determine which military jobs (or Military Occupational Specialities/MOS) may be the best fit for you. These composite scores are only one factor in determining which military job is right for you. The recruiter will also use job availability, physical and medical qualifications, and eligibility for security clearance as additional factors. Each branch of the service also defines their own composite scores and eligibility requirements. Some of these definitions and requirements are shown below:
5. Studies have shown again and again that birth order strongly influences the person one will eventually become. Oldest children have been shown to be more responsible and perform better in school. Younger children tend to do less well in school and be more free spirited. Cindy is a good example. She graduated on the Dean’s list, and her parents report she always did her chores as a child.
Agent Orange BAH benefits career transition COLA college Congress Department of Defense education gi bill government shutdown Guard and Reserve insurance medical military military benefits military education military education benefits military families military healthcare benefits military pay military retirees military retirement military spouses montgomery bill myPay online degrees online education pell grants PTSD retirement scholarship school Sequestration SGLI student aid transition tricare tuition VA veteran veterans veterans benefits veterans healthcare women in the military
The Navy tends to be more restrictive than the Army for people enlisting with a GED instead of a high school diploma. The minimum AFQT score for enlistment in the Navy is 31 if you have a high school diploma, and 50 if you have a GED. In addition to scoring a 50, those with a GED must be at least 19 years old and must be able to prove their work history. GED recruits comprise only 5 to 10 percent of each year's Navy class. When the Navy receives too many female applicants, the minimum AFQT requirement for females is raised to 50, because on-ship housing for females is limited. A minimum score of 50 is also required by any applicant who wishes to qualify for the Navy College Fund or college loan repayment program.

I’ve taken my asvab twice and my first time taking the test I made a 29 with my fellow jr class when I was in high school. The second time around I went to okc to take it on the computer my jr year and I made a 16. Is there anyway I can get help to pass I want to join the military and have a high school diploma. I need help with passing any suggestions? Please help me.


The Paragraph Comprehension section of the test measures your ability to read a passage and interpret the information contained within it. You may read a selection and be asked to interpret the author’s purpose, or what a particular word in the passage means, based on the context of the sentence where it appears. To help you better prepare for the exam, the Paragraph Comprehension section of the ASVAB practice test has passages of similar length and style to those on the actual ASVAB test. The CAT-ASVAB test has 11 questions in 22 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 15 questions in 13 minutes.
A wheel and axle can be thought of as a flexible lever that rotates around a center point that acts as the fulcrum. The arm lengths are represented by the radius of the wheel upon which the load force is applied and the radius upon which the load is applied. Depending upon which wheels the load and resistance forces are applied, the wheel and axle can multiply force or multiply speed.
Kaplan ASVAB Premier 2017 with 6 Practice Tests: Book + Videos + Online + Mobile. The Kaplan ASVAB study guide is the biggest and most complete option that you can buy. The 2017 version includes 6 practice tests with more than 1,000 questions. Three of the practice tests are in the book and the other 3 are available online. Access to an online quiz bank is also included. It also comes with access to online videos that offer test-taking advice with a focus on the AFQT portion of the exam.
If you are interested in using your test scores for military service, you will receive an Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. This score is calculated using the scores from the Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and Mathematics Knowledge (MK) portions of the exam. AFQT scores are expressed as percentile scores in order to better compare results among all potential military recruits.
The Arithmetic Reasoning section of the ASVAB test focuses on word problems and delivers mathematical questions and equations in a format that must be synthesized. These may not only be simple questions involving basic multiplication, but may also be as complex as completing a physics equation listed in paragraph or word-block format. When deconstructing these word problems, pay close attention to all aspects of the question, including all numbers mentioned, buzzwords, and the format of the paragraph itself. The following pointers will give you a more in-depth analysis of each component of word problems.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a multiple choice test, administered by the United States Military Entrance Processing Command, used to determine qualification for enlistment in the United States Armed Forces. It is often offered to American high school students when they are in the 10th, 11th and 12th grade, though anyone eligible for enlistment may take it.[2]
×