When adding or subtracting signed numbers with the same sign, the answer will always have the sign of the two numbers.  When the signs are different, subtract the smaller number from the larger number and give the answer the sign of the larger number.  When multiplying and dividing signed numbers, the answer will be negative if one of the numbers is negative and positive if the signs are the same.
My son wants to serve in the military. He graduates this May from HS. He’s taken a practice ASVAB at school along with others wanting to join. He’s very bright and is a B student at at his school and knows the class material. However, he didn’t test well on the ASFAB pretest at school with only a 16. His concern is that he won’t get in the military and is worried he won’t be able to serve in some military capacity. Any ideas on how we can help him? Thanks!

The multiples of a number are the set of numbers formed by multiplying a number by other numbers.  For example, the first five multiples of 3 are {3, 6, 9, 12, 15}.  The least common multiple of two numbers is the smallest number that both numbers factor into evenly.  The first five multiples of of 4 are {4, 8, 12, 16, 20} making the least common multiple of 3 and 4 equal to 12.


The ASVAB test is taken by individuals interested in joining the U.S. military. It may be taken by high school students in the 10th, 11th or 12th grade. Or, it may be taken by someone who has earned a GED or higher degree. Along with determining your suitability for enlistment, the score you receive on this test lets officials know what military occupational specialties you may qualify for. 
Unlike enlisted applicants, officer candidates are judged solely on their General-Technical line score and not their AFQT score. Remember, the General-Technical score is comprised of the sum of Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, and the Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. The GT score requirement for prospective officers for each branch is detailed below. Note, the Air Force and the Navy do not use the ASVAB for officer applicants and rely on their own exams. 

How were you at math in high school? This subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is going to put you to the test. It is filled with questions covering basic high school math. Unfortunately, that means there is a lot for this test to cover, which means you’ll have to do a lot of jumping from one math concept to the next during the course of this subtest. One way to get ready for these rapid switches is to take our practice test – but we’ll talk more about that later. Right now, let’s take a closer look at the Mathematics Knowledge subtest. On the Mathematics Knowledge subtest you will have 24 minutes to answer 25 questions on the paper version of the ASVAB. On the CAT-ASVAB you will have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions. This subtest is counted as part of your Armed Forces Qualification Test score, so you will want to perform as well as you can. A good score on this subtest is also important to qualify for a number of military jobs.


A switch is a device for opening and closing an electric circuit – when the switch is open, no current flows.  Switches are categorized by the number of poles and throws they provide with the number of poles designating the number of electrical circuits the switch can control and the number of throws indicating the number of connections the switch can make between those circuits.
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Focus on the four essential sections, those critical to the AFQT score, first. From the example above, it seems that your verbal abilities are at least OK: you gave yourself a 4 on the Word Knowledge section and a 3 on the Paragraph Comprehension. However, your math skills could use some work – especially with Mathematics Knowledge, as you only have a skill level of 2. This you that you'll have to work extra hard on the math sections.
The results of each test are shown as soon as you complete it. You’ll see what you got right and how it compares to other people who took the same test. Feedback is also visual, showing your percentile and success on each question compared to others. The answers to each ASVAB practice test question are explained as well. The free ASVAB example questions are both tools for learning and for comparing your results to your own previous attempts, and to the scores of your classmates and peers. You can use the scores as a baseline and to identify your weaknesses. With this information, it becomes easier to focus your study time and effort on areas that need improvement.

As you go along, keep in mind that the ASVAB practice test is just that: practice. Memorizing these questions and answers will not be very helpful on the actual test because it is unlikely to have any of the same exact questions. If you only know the right answers to the sample questions, you won’t be prepared for the real thing. Study the concepts until you understand them fully, and then you’ll be able to answer any question that shows up on the test.

Kaplan ASVAB Premier is our best overall and best value prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation guides. One major strong suit about Kaplan's is that it has a gargantuan amount of practice problems. With over 1,800 practice problems and 6 full-length practice tests, you should never run out of questions to practice with. This repetition will really prepare you for exam day.
Air Force recruits must score at least 36 points the 99-point ASVAB. The overall ASVAB score is known as the AFQT score, or Armed Forces Qualification Test score. Exceptions may be made, however, for a handful of high school graduates who can score as low as 31. The vast majority, some 70 percent, of those accepted for an Air Force enlistment achieve a score of 50 or above.
The test must be completed if you wish to serve in the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, or Coast Guard. The test can also be taken as a career-exploration tool if you are a high school sophomore, junior, or senior. It takes approximately three hours to complete. If you take the computerized version of the test, results are given immediately. If you complete a paper and pencil test, you’ll get results within two weeks.
Your success on ASVAB test day depends not only on how many hours you put into preparing, but also on whether you prepared the right way. It’s good to check along the way to see whether your studying is paying off. One of the most effective ways to do this is by taking ASVAB practice tests to evaluate your progress. Practice tests are useful because they show exactly where you need to improve. Every time you take a ASVAB practice test, pay special attention to these three groups of questions:
There is another ASVAB score that's equally important, if not more so, because it is the score that determines if a person is eligible for military service. It's the Armed Forces Qualification Test score, or AFQT score. This score is calculated from only four of the nine Standard Scores on the ASVAB - Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). First, the WK and PC scores are added together, then the sum is doubled. This is known as the Verbal Expression (VE) score. The VE, MK, and AR scores are then added together, and the sum is the AFQT. This score is a straight percentile measure, expressed as a number from 1-99. The number is the percentage of people who scored lower than the test taker. For example, if a person receives an AFQT score of 63, that means that he did better on the test than 63% of the people who have taken it.

Feedback = I recently bought this study guide and the moment i started reading into it i could tell this would be a great study guide. Its straight to the point and very informative. I noticed right away that its not a huge book because they left out extra unnecessary details that make a study guide seem like its got all the answer. I will take the asvab in 3 weeks and with this guide I’m sure I will ace the test.


My student and I like how there are videos in between. This allows him to visually see and hear about the information in a different way. It breaks up the book and makes it more interesting. I also like the setup of the book. So far, he has taken the Word Knowledge practice test after reviewing and received a score of 32/35, which seems to be a very good score. He wants to join the National Guard but did not score high enough on the ASVAB the two times he took the test previously. This study guide seems to really be helping him with the secrets and tools to achieve a higher score.
The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
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