Paragraph Comprehension tests the ability to obtain information from written material. Students read different types of passages of varying lengths and respond to questions based on information presented in each passage. Concepts include identifying stated and reworded facts, determining a sequence of events, drawing conclusions, identifying main ideas, determining the author's purpose and tone, and identifying style and technique.
ASVAB for Dummies is our 4th best overall prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation guides. One main positive of this prep book is that there are tons of practice tests. With 7 online practice tests, this preparation guide will give you tons of repetition to be ready for exam day. Practice questions are one of the best ways to learn and the easiest way to improve your weaknesses.
Retesting is possible depending on a variety of circumstances. It is possible to retake the ASVAB or PiCAT, but you will need to coordinate this with your recruiting office. In general you may be required to wait a month or more to retake the test; each branch of the service may have different requirements that must be fulfilled in order to retest.
The ASVAB is a series of tests developed by the Department of Defense and is used by the U.S. Army to determine whether you have the mental aptitude to enlist. The ASVAB also helps determine which Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) you qualify for. The ASVAB is required to enlist in the U.S. Army and is valid for two years. The ASVAB may be given in a computerized version at a Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) or in a paper version at various Military Entrance Test (MET) sites around the country or at high schools and colleges. 

Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and Mathematics Knowledge (MK). Scores on the AFQT are used to determine your eligibility for enlistment in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps. The other six test scores on the ASVAB tests are used to determine the best job for you in the military as your grades will demonstrate knowledge, skill, and interest in certain subjects and tasks. 


Kaplan ASVAB Premier 2017 with 6 Practice Tests: Book + Videos + Online + Mobile. The Kaplan ASVAB study guide is the biggest and most complete option that you can buy. The 2017 version includes 6 practice tests with more than 1,000 questions. Three of the practice tests are in the book and the other 3 are available online. Access to an online quiz bank is also included. It also comes with access to online videos that offer test-taking advice with a focus on the AFQT portion of the exam.

Also, the answer explanations for all of these problems are very in-depth and detailed. Learning from your mistakes is one of the top ways to learn and this book really allows you to do that. Along with all the practice questions you get an all-inclusive and in-depth subject review on all of the topics included in the exam. Nothing is left out. Because of this, this is the only review book that you will need, no other supplement guides are needed (helping to save you money by only having to buy one guide!).
One flaw of this review guide is that the summary is not as comprehensive as other prep guides. At only 324 Pages, this prep book does not have enough length to meticulously go through all of the topics. If you are looking for an in-depth rundown you may need to supplement this prep book with another review guide. If you just need a quick overview, however, this guide may be perfect for you.
Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]
A switch is a device for opening and closing an electric circuit – when the switch is open, no current flows.  Switches are categorized by the number of poles and throws they provide with the number of poles designating the number of electrical circuits the switch can control and the number of throws indicating the number of connections the switch can make between those circuits.
Another advantage of taking practice tests is that you can assess your performance and see if you need to study and practice more, or if you're already prepared enough to achieve success on your test day. If you do well on the practice test, then you know you're prepared. If you struggle on the practice test, then you know you may still have more work to do to get prepared. Taking lots of practice tests helps ensure that you are not surprised or disappointed on your test day.
Mathematical reasoning requires you to focus on all aspects of the word problem, with particular attention to buzzwords indicating the action to take: multiplication, division, etc. Seek out important phrases, such as “difference,” “minus,” and “take away” for subtraction, or “product,” “times,” and “double” for multiplication. Before tackling the question as a whole, look for such buzzwords and identify what process the word problem requires. From there, you can continue to solve the overall equation
For the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy a retest will only be authorized if a recruit's test scores expire, their scores are too low, if the recruiter feels your scores do not match your qualifications, or in the event of special circumstances that bar a recruit from taking the test. A retest will not be authorized to simply increase an already successful score in order to qualify for particular occupations or for enlistment bonuses. Usually, recruits with successful scores holding a job reservation or who are enrolled in the Delay Entry Program (DEP) are not eligible to retest.
There are two parts to the ASVAB: One helps determine which types of positions will be the best fit for you and your skills, and the other is an aptitude test that determines whether or not you're eligible to enlist in the Army, Navy, Air Force or Marine Corps. The aptitude portion, known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), gauges word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, arithmetic reasoning and mathematics knowledge.
An inductor stores energy in the form of a magnetic field and inductance is the property of a component that opposes the change in current of an AC circuit.  An inductor is often formed by wrapping a wire coil around a magnetic core and the level of inductance is directly proportional to the number of turns in the coil, its radius, and the type of material in the core.
The sections are as follows, General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and a Verbal Expression score influenced by the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension sections of the test. Those looking to join the Navy also complete a Coding Speed test.
In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
This will show you exactly what your weak areas are, and where you need to devote more study time. Ask yourself why each of these questions gave you trouble. Was it because you didn’t understand the material? Was it because you didn’t remember the vocabulary? Do you need more repetitions on this type of question to build speed and confidence? Dig into those questions and figure out how you can strengthen your weak areas as you go back to review the material.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is more commonly known as the ASVAB Test. If you are interested in a military career, you will need to pass this challenging test in order to qualify. It is used for all branches of the military which includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard, and Coast Guard. It is also used to gauge your abilities in specific areas that may be relevant to your job assignments within the military. For more information about the exact details of this exam, check out our article titled What is the ASVAB Test?
While you may want to get the ASVAB over with, it is important to give yourself enough time to prepare and practice for the ASVAB. Once you take the test you will have to wait 30 days before you are eligible to re-take the test if you got a non-passing score, or if you want a better grade. After you retake the test twice, you will need to wait for a 6 month time period before being able to take the test again. For this reason, it is important to pick an ASVAB test date that gives you plenty of time to practice and prepare for each section of the test.
We hope you find our study guides useful as you begin preparing to take the ASVAB! If you’re social like we are, please reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest. We’d love to answer your questions, get your feedback, or just hear more about your thoughts on the ASVAB or your intended branch of service. Good luck studying and congrats as you take this exciting first step towards your military career!
The ASVAB test is taken by individuals interested in joining the U.S. military. It may be taken by high school students in the 10th, 11th or 12th grade. Or, it may be taken by someone who has earned a GED or higher degree. Along with determining your suitability for enlistment, the score you receive on this test lets officials know what military occupational specialties you may qualify for. 
One flaw of this review guide is that the summary is not as comprehensive as other prep guides. At only 324 Pages, this prep book does not have enough length to meticulously go through all of the topics. If you are looking for an in-depth rundown you may need to supplement this prep book with another review guide. If you just need a quick overview, however, this guide may be perfect for you.
You should note that the exam is given only in English. This is because all of the documents you will need to reference during your military career are in English. Even if English is not your native language, you should be able to make the cut as long as you study enough. You may need to take another test, the ECL (English Comprehension Level), to make sure that you can read and follow instructions given English if it is not your native language.
AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
The Mathematics Knowledge section of the exam measures your knowledge of various math areas, such as algebra and geometry. You may be asked to find the square root of a number or the volume of a brick with given dimensions. Algebraic problems may require finding the value of “y” in a given equation. A review of math symbols—such as ≠, ≤, and √—can help you solve the given problems much faster, and using our ASVAB math study guide to practice answering the algebra and geometry questions on the test can help increase your overall AFQT score. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 20 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 24 minutes.
Varsity Tutors’ ASVAB Learning Tools can also help you work in groups, if you so choose. They let you post results on social media so others can see how you did. Many people actually share their progress over time and make this an opportunity to help one another; they’ll even compete in practice tests to make them more fun. The ASVAB practice tests provide a sample of the material you’ll be asked to work with on test day. They are structured in a precise, non-intimidating format with honest and detailed feedback. The study process is made simpler and more efficient while also facilitating a more personalized process of studying.
In addition to the ASVAB's AFQT, each branch has military occupational specialty, or MOS, scores. Combinations of scores from the nine tests are used to determine qualification for a MOS. These combinations are called "aptitude area scores", "composite scores", or "line scores". Each of the five armed services has its own aptitude area scores and sets its own minimum composite scores for each MOS.
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