Don’t confuse a standard score with the graded-on-a-curve score you may have seen on school tests — where the scores range from 1 to 100 with the majority of students scoring between 70 and 100. With standard scores, the majority score is between 30 and 70. That means that a standard score of 50 is an average score and that a score of 60 is an above-average score.

AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.

The Navy tends to be more restrictive than the Army for people enlisting with a GED instead of a high school diploma. The minimum AFQT score for enlistment in the Navy is 31 if you have a high school diploma, and 50 if you have a GED. In addition to scoring a 50, those with a GED must be at least 19 years old and must be able to prove their work history. GED recruits comprise only 5 to 10 percent of each year's Navy class. When the Navy receives too many female applicants, the minimum AFQT requirement for females is raised to 50, because on-ship housing for females is limited. A minimum score of 50 is also required by any applicant who wishes to qualify for the Navy College Fund or college loan repayment program.
The paper version of the ASVAB is similar to the CAT-ASVAB, but with a few notable differences. The difficulty of the tests are the same; however, the auto and shop information subtests are combined into one section, and the amount of questions and the time available for the subtests are different. On the paper version you will have 149 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours, to complete 225 questions. The table below provides a breakdown for the Paper & Pencil ASVAB:

Taking the PiCAT exam may, depending on circumstances including scores and other factors, may relieve a new recruit of having to take the ASVAB in a proctored setting. In the past, recruits who were preparing to enter military service at Military Entrance Processing Station would take the ASVAB in a group setting; PiCAT can help new recruits avoid having to retake the test. PiCAT test performance and other factors will determine whether or not the ASVAB has to be taken at MEPS.
Education Requirements – Recruits without a high school diploma are practically ineligible to enlist. The Marine Corps do not allow more than 5% of recruits to enlist without a high school diploma, and those recruits must have a GED. Those with only a GED must score at least a 50 on the AFQT to be considered. As with the other branches, the Marine Corps provides advanced enlistment rank for recruits that have some college experience (i.e. credits). However, the Marines are less generous to recruits with some college credit as they only allow the maximum advanced rank of E-2 upon enlistment.
The CAT-ASVAB is a multiple choice computer test consisting of ten subtests totaling 145 questions with an allotted time of 153 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours. The test will be adaptive meaning each question will be adapted to the skill level of the examinee based on their previous answers. The overwhelming majority of those, currently in the military, took the CAT-ASVAB. The table below provides a breakdown for the CAT-ASVAB:
Whenever possible, military personnel (active duty, National Guard, and reserve) will arrange to take the in-service ASVAB from your service’s Test Control Officer at a military installation; however, on a case-by-case basis, Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) commanders may authorize administration of an ASVAB for in-service purposes at their MEPS. You must submit a memorandum from your unit commander requesting the MEPS to administer an ASVAB. The memorandum must include;
Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), Auto & Shop Information (AS), and Mechanical Comprehension (MC). These subtests focus on basic knowledge of science, math, writing and vocabulary, an understanding of structural development and mechanics, auto function and repair, and a knowledge of electric currents, electronic systems, and circuits. These are all skills and knowledge that are necessary for different sectors of military service. Scores in each subtest are based on the student’s ability to answer the questions correctly and to complete the test in time to answer as many of the questions as possible.
Tests are administered at participating schools. Neither schools nor students incur any costs for taking the ASVAB or using the Career Exploration Program. A test administrator is provided for every testing session and that person has no additional recruitment responsibilities. Various accommodations are available for the ASVAB, such as having questions read aloud, providing extra time, and other accommodations. School staff members are responsible, however, for tests that are administered with accommodations because test administrators are only able to administer the ASVAB by following the standardized procedure. If the test is being used for enlisting, only scores obtained during standardized test sessions (with no accommodations) can be used.

Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.
PiCAT testing does require a shorter “verification test” for new recruits. This is in the form of a short, proctored test that lasts about a half an hour. Depending on circumstances, recruits may be required to take this verification test at a Military Entrance Processing Station, or within 30 days of taking PiCAT if the recruit is not going to MEPS right away. Those who do not pass the verification test will be required to take the ASVAB.

The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.


Since 1976, the multiple-choice ASVAB has been used for initial aptitude screening as well as MOS classification. The exam has changed since its inception. While some parts have remained, such as arithmetic reasoning and word knowledge, others like tool knowledge have been removed in favor of questions related to assembling objects. After nearly 20 years of research and development, a computer-adaptive version of the exam was implemented in 1996. The CAT-ASVAB is the first large-scale adaptive battery test to be administered in high-stakes environments like a Military Entrance Processing Station. The paper and pencil, or P&P version is still used at a variety of other military testing sites.
It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.
When you're finished with the course materials, take our complete ASVAB practice exams. These practice exams were crafted in the style of the actual ASVAB exam, so you can get comfortable with the exam's content, question format and difficulty level. The practice exams help reinforce your understanding of the material you've studied, and they'll identify incorrect answers, so you can go back to specific lessons and fill in any knowledge gaps if necessary. If you ever get stuck or need any extra help, reach out to our expert academic tutors. They'll be happy to help you out and answer any questions you may have.
Tests are administered at participating schools. Neither schools nor students incur any costs for taking the ASVAB or using the Career Exploration Program. A test administrator is provided for every testing session and that person has no additional recruitment responsibilities. Various accommodations are available for the ASVAB, such as having questions read aloud, providing extra time, and other accommodations. School staff members are responsible, however, for tests that are administered with accommodations because test administrators are only able to administer the ASVAB by following the standardized procedure. If the test is being used for enlisting, only scores obtained during standardized test sessions (with no accommodations) can be used.

Mathematics Knowledge. This section measures one's knowledge of mathematical principles and concepts. Arithmetic, geometry, and high school level algebra will comprise most of the problems. Knowing how to factor, solve, and simplify algebraic expressions; understanding exponents, absolute values, and systems of equations and solving inequalities will be helpful. You will also encounter words problems. Test takers should know how to solve word problems by creating algebraic equations. See product recommendations for more advice.


The one main weakness of this book is that the subject chapters have a lot of fluff and empty space. This really wastes your time because you are learning things or topics that you do not really need to know for the exam. It would be a lot better if all of the paragraphs in the book added value to your preparation time. Because of this, we rank Master the ASVAB as our 5th overall prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation books.
The Word Knowledge subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery measures your vocabulary knowledge. It is one of the four subtests, along with paragraph comprehension, arithmetic reasoning and mathematics knowledge, which are used to determine your Armed Forces Qualification Test score, which in turn determines your eligibility for military service. In addition, a good score on this section is required for a number of military jobs, everything from the obvious journalist position to the maybe not so obvious firefighter position. In other words, this is an important section of the ASVAB to do well and you should be sure to devote sufficient study time to preparing for this subtest. On the Word Knowledge subtest you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions if you take the CAT-ASVAB. If you take the paper ASVAB, you will have 11 minutes to answer 35 questions. On this test, you will be required to both differentiate words based on their spelling and to know what various words mean.
The Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB test, is required of all people trying to enlist in the United States military service (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps) or the United States Coast Guard. This multiple-choice test is divided into eight subtests to assess individual subject area strengths and weaknesses. Passing (being admitted to the branch of service) is determined by a combination of ASVAB score and if the future enlistee has graduated from high school or has a GED (General Educational Development series of tests). Enlistees must also pass the ASVAB with a certain scores for each subtest to be eligible to obtain certain jobs within the service.
2018 © Study Guide Zone All rights reserved. All information on this site is provided as is, without warranty. Since we are giving information away, we cannot be held liable for incidental mistakes. Test names and other trademarks are the property of the respective trademark holders. None of the trademark holders are affiliated with StudyGuideZone.com. Permission is not required to add a link to this resource. Privacy Policy
Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.
Another advantage of taking practice tests is that you can assess your performance and see if you need to study and practice more, or if you're already prepared enough to achieve success on your test day. If you do well on the practice test, then you know you're prepared. If you struggle on the practice test, then you know you may still have more work to do to get prepared. Taking lots of practice tests helps ensure that you are not surprised or disappointed on your test day.
Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), Auto & Shop Information (AS), and Mechanical Comprehension (MC). These subtests focus on basic knowledge of science, math, writing and vocabulary, an understanding of structural development and mechanics, auto function and repair, and a knowledge of electric currents, electronic systems, and circuits. These are all skills and knowledge that are necessary for different sectors of military service. Scores in each subtest are based on the student’s ability to answer the questions correctly and to complete the test in time to answer as many of the questions as possible.

An inductor stores energy in the form of a magnetic field and inductance is the property of a component that opposes the change in current of an AC circuit.  An inductor is often formed by wrapping a wire coil around a magnetic core and the level of inductance is directly proportional to the number of turns in the coil, its radius, and the type of material in the core.
Reading page after page of boring content can cause the strongest minds to wander. Taking practice tests are a great way to break up the monotony of studying. Taking a practice test challenges you and keeps you interested in the material. Then you can review your test results and go over the questions you got wrong committing the right answer to memory. It’s a great, streamlined way to learn.

The vast majority of ASVAB test takers will ultimately not enlist in the military. The ASVAB Career Exploration Program claims that only two-and-a-half percent of those who participate in the ASVAB join the military. Forty-seven percent of those who take the exam indicate an interest in attending a four-year college, and 16 percent of those who take the exam originally indicate some kind of an interest in joining the military.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is one of the most widely used multiple-aptitude test batteries in the world. It was originally designed to predict success in military occupations and is used today to help both those considering entering the military (mostly high school-aged students, but also anyone who is eligible to enlist) as well as those not interested in military service (who comprise the majority of current ASVAB test takers) what sort of career may be the best fit for them. Scores from the ASVAB can be used when enlisting in the military. Students interested in taking the ASVAB should check with their high school to find out when and if the ASVAB will be offered at their school. If it is not offered, students should meet with their guidance counselor to determine if it is possible to schedule a testing session in the future. There is no cost to take the ASVAB.

A star is a large gaseous body and planets and other material orbit stars and other massive objects with the shape of an orbit determined by the strength of the gravitational pull of the object that is being orbited.  A galaxy is a large cluster of stars held together by gravity where distance is measured in multiples of a light year which is the distance light travels in one year and is approximately 5.9 trillion miles.

There are three different versions of the ASVAB: the Computer Adaptive Test (CAT), the Student version, and the Paper & Pencil version. The Student version of the ASVAB is remarkably similar to the Paper & Pencil version, and is typically administered to high school students across the country. For the purposes of this website, we will focus on the CAT and the Paper & Pencil versions exclusively.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is one of the most widely used multiple-aptitude test batteries in the world. It was originally designed to predict success in military occupations and is used today to help both those considering entering the military (mostly high school-aged students, but also anyone who is eligible to enlist) as well as those not interested in military service (who comprise the majority of current ASVAB test takers) what sort of career may be the best fit for them. Scores from the ASVAB can be used when enlisting in the military. Students interested in taking the ASVAB should check with their high school to find out when and if the ASVAB will be offered at their school. If it is not offered, students should meet with their guidance counselor to determine if it is possible to schedule a testing session in the future. There is no cost to take the ASVAB.
The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.
Education Requirements – Recruits without a high school diploma are practically ineligible to enlist. The Marine Corps do not allow more than 5% of recruits to enlist without a high school diploma, and those recruits must have a GED. Those with only a GED must score at least a 50 on the AFQT to be considered. As with the other branches, the Marine Corps provides advanced enlistment rank for recruits that have some college experience (i.e. credits). However, the Marines are less generous to recruits with some college credit as they only allow the maximum advanced rank of E-2 upon enlistment.
Master the ASVAB is our 5th best overall prep book on our list of the best ASVAB prep books. One positive about this review guide is the diagnostic test. This diagnostic test is very good for helping you to figure out your weaknesses. When you know your weaknesses you can focus your preparation on those things that you can improve to get a higher score on the exam. This really allows you to save time studying since you don't need to practice the topics that you already have a good grasp of.
A good score on the ASVAB is different than a minimum required score.  Each of the military branches will have their own minimum required scores (see below).  In practice, however, each branch will be more selective in their recruiting.  A score of 50 on the ASVAB implies that you scored as well or better than 50% of comparable test-takers.  Since ASVAB scores are used for many purposes (e.g., enlistment eligibility, military job placements, and career exploration), it is important that you score well on the ASVAB.  A score of 60 or better should be your minimum target.
This study guide is what it claims to be…fluff free and comprehensive. Some study guides give you a lot of stuff you don’t really need just to make themselves look thicker and fuller. And then you have to waste a lot of time weeding through it all trying to figure out what’s good and what’s padding. This guide has the information you need and that’s that. It’s really comprehensive, though, and doesn’t leave things out at the same time. Plus, it has some other great tips like study secrets and test mistakes to avoid. And even better yet, none of it costs much! And you get it all in one guide.
The Auto and Shop Information section of the ASVAB test measures your knowledge of automobile technology and basic repairs. The shop questions are about basic wood and metals. For example, you will encounter questions such as “Shock absorbers on a car connect the axle to the: wheel, chassis, drive shaft, or exhaust pipe?” You may be asked what sanding blocks are used for, followed by the following choices: preventing high spots and ridges on sanded surfaces, preventing dirt from collecting on the sandpaper, stretching the length of sandpaper, or prolonging the use of the sandpaper. The CAT-ASVAB test has two parts: the first part covering automotive material asks 11 questions in 7 minutes; the 11 shop information questions are allotted 6 minutes. The paper-and-pencil version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
The various armed forces adopted all of those aspects in 1976. At that point in time, the test was in its written form rather than today’s more common form (computerized test format). The written form covers all of the previously mentioned areas as well, which is why both forms are still available. All-in-all that answers the question concerning the intention of the test.
×