The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
Nobody wants to be stuck doing something they don’t like. That’s why we urge you to take advantage of our free practice tests and study guides.  Our ASVAB practice tests are formatted exactly like the real ASVAB test and will not only help ensure you have the knowledge to ace the real exam but will also prepare for the actual experience of sitting for the test.
Taking the PiCAT exam may, depending on circumstances including scores and other factors, may relieve a new recruit of having to take the ASVAB in a proctored setting. In the past, recruits who were preparing to enter military service at Military Entrance Processing Station would take the ASVAB in a group setting; PiCAT can help new recruits avoid having to retake the test. PiCAT test performance and other factors will determine whether or not the ASVAB has to be taken at MEPS.
Mathematics Knowledge. This section measures one's knowledge of mathematical principles and concepts. Arithmetic, geometry, and high school level algebra will comprise most of the problems. Knowing how to factor, solve, and simplify algebraic expressions; understanding exponents, absolute values, and systems of equations and solving inequalities will be helpful. You will also encounter words problems. Test takers should know how to solve word problems by creating algebraic equations. See product recommendations for more advice.
ASVAB Score – The Coast Guard is the most difficult branch of the military to enter with a minimum ASVAB score of 45 required to enlist. A waiver is possible if a recruit’s scores on subtests outside of the AFQT, such as Mechanical Comprehension, make the recruit eligible for a specific job and the recruit is willing to agree to enter that job upon enlistment.
This advice, though well-intentioned, doesn’t address the needs of some new recruits who are interested in specific career fields but are worried about their test performance-especially in areas related to math comprehension. Potential recruits who feel deficient in math, language, or science skills should have a frank conversation with their recruiter to discuss possible refresher study or even supplemental classes in any self-perceived “problem areas” before taking the test.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a test that covers basic knowledge such as math and verbal skills, writing skills, and vocabulary. It is a required test for entrance into the military, but it can also be an indicator for general aptitude skills for other purposes. For those looking to go into military service, the ASVAB score is a crucial indicator of prospective job placement, so it is very important to take this test seriously and to focus on your strengths when taking the exam. Higher test scores often mean better jobs, higher salary, and more opportunities for advancement in the military.
To get started, take our free ASVAB practice exam on Study.com. This 15-question assessment evaluates your current understanding of the subjects that appear on the ASVAB, such as general science, mathematics, electronics and reading comprehension. Then, we'll immediately give you a diagnostic report of your performance that identifies where you need to focus and suggests a customized path of study. By recognizing the topics you need to study most, you can prepare for the ASVAB in a streamlined manner and focus on areas of the exam that will most impact your score.
Students are given a Standard Score for each of the subtests. Standard Scores are derived from your Raw Scores (total number of points you receive on each subtest). The Standard Scores are a statistically derived score that typically ranges from 30 and 70 for each subtest. The Standard Scores are created such that a 50 represents a mean (average) score and there is a standard deviation of 10 (implying that 95% of test takers are within two standard deviations, 20 pts, of the mean of 50).

Composite Scores are sometimes referred to as “line scores”, “aptitude area scores”, or “MOS scores”. These scores are derived by adding different combinations of the sub test standard scores. Composite scores are used by the different branches of the U.S. Armed Services to determine which military jobs (or Military Occupational Specialities/MOS) may be the best fit for you. These composite scores are only one factor in determining which military job is right for you. The recruiter will also use job availability, physical and medical qualifications, and eligibility for security clearance as additional factors. Each branch of the service also defines their own composite scores and eligibility requirements. Some of these definitions and requirements are shown below:


The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is more commonly known as the ASVAB Test. If you are interested in a military career, you will need to pass this challenging test in order to qualify. It is used for all branches of the military which includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard, and Coast Guard. It is also used to gauge your abilities in specific areas that may be relevant to your job assignments within the military. For more information about the exact details of this exam, check out our article titled What is the ASVAB Test?
General Science tests the ability to answer questions on a variety of science topics drawn from courses taught in most high schools. The life science items cover botany, zoology, anatomy and physiology, and ecology. The earth and space science items are based on astronomy, geology, meteorology and oceanography. The physical science items measure force and motion mechanics, energy, fluids, atomic structure and chemistry.
The ASVAB test is administered to potential military recruits to help determine which branch of service and which military jobs they will be best suited for. It is not a test of intelligence and is administered only in English. The test consists of nine subjects: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, and Assembling Objects.
The Auto and Shop Information section of the ASVAB test measures your knowledge of automobile technology and basic repairs. The shop questions are about basic wood and metals. For example, you will encounter questions such as “Shock absorbers on a car connect the axle to the: wheel, chassis, drive shaft, or exhaust pipe?” You may be asked what sanding blocks are used for, followed by the following choices: preventing high spots and ridges on sanded surfaces, preventing dirt from collecting on the sandpaper, stretching the length of sandpaper, or prolonging the use of the sandpaper. The CAT-ASVAB test has two parts: the first part covering automotive material asks 11 questions in 7 minutes; the 11 shop information questions are allotted 6 minutes. The paper-and-pencil version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
I will highly recomend this study guide to anyone in need of help studying for the ASVAB, I have only had it for a few days and I already see a tremendous amount of improvement in my practice tests. This book gives helpful tips on test taking which has always been something I’ve struggled with, but not anymore! Throughout this study guide you get help with every part of the ASVAB and it has a practice test for each part, which is extremely helpful to me because it shows me what I retained well and what I need to work on still. This study guide is the best tool I have used in aid of my ASVAB test preparation, and I know my score will reflect highly due to the ASVAB SECRETS Study Guide.
The ASVAB currently contains 9 sections (except the written test, which contains 8 sections). The duration of each test varies from as low as ten minutes up to 36 minutes for Arithmetic Reasoning; the entire ASVAB is three hours long. The test is typically administered in a computerized format at Military Entrance Processing Stations, known as MEPS, or at a satellite location called a Military Entrance Test (MET) site. The ASVAB is administered by computer at the MEPS, while a written version is given at most MET sites. Testing procedures vary depending on the mode of administration.[3]
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