This study guide is what it claims to be…fluff free and comprehensive. Some study guides give you a lot of stuff you don’t really need just to make themselves look thicker and fuller. And then you have to waste a lot of time weeding through it all trying to figure out what’s good and what’s padding. This guide has the information you need and that’s that. It’s really comprehensive, though, and doesn’t leave things out at the same time. Plus, it has some other great tips like study secrets and test mistakes to avoid. And even better yet, none of it costs much! And you get it all in one guide.
Understanding the latest test-taking strategies is essential to preparing you for what you will expect on the exam. A test taker has to not only understand the material that is being covered on the test, but also must be familiar with the strategies that are necessary to properly utilize the time provided and get through the test without making any avoidable errors. Test Prep Books has drilled down the top test-taking tips for you to know.
Unlike other vocabulary building books which just provide a lengthy list of words and definitions, Barron's organizes 800 words into sentence completion exercises of 10 words at a time which makes integrating these words into your everyday vocabulary much easier than just going down a list and relying on rote memorization. If you have an average vocabulary and and are looking to do well on the ASTB, Barron's Essential Words for the GRE is a great addition to your study material.
There are many misconceptions about what it’s like to serve in the U.S. military. If you don’t know any soldiers personally, you might think of the military as a place for infantry, trudging though rough terrain and loading giant artillery. Although that may have been true in the past, today’s military offers many opportunities that aren’t readily apparent to the typical high school graduate. For example, there are jobs in aviation mechanics, medicine, and accounting. There are also peacekeeping and humanitarian efforts by the United States military that require skills in verbal and written communication. Taking the exam can help you determine if you would be well-suited to one of these occupations.

For applicants with a high school diploma, the minimum required AFQT score to enlist in the Coast Guard is 40, while GED applicants must score a 50. GED recruits make up only 5 percent of each year's Coast Guard class. If an applicant's ASVAB subtest scores qualify for a specific job that is in demand, use of a waiver is possible if the applicant agrees to enlist for that job.
Examinees also receive a score on what is called the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). AFQT scores are computed using the Standard Scores from four ASVAB subtests: Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national norming study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 90 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 90% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year old youth. An AFQT score of 50 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 50% of the nationally-representative sample.
Line Scores are composed of the sum of particular combinations of ASVAB subtests. These scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Line Scores are not used to determine eligibility for particular military occupations for officer candidates. Job availability for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS).
On the CAT-ASVAB, you answer one question at a time and can’t go back and change your answers once you’ve submitted them. If you answer a question correctly, you get a more difficult question, but if you are incorrect, you are given an easier question to answer. This is called “adaptive” testing. Once you finish a section you can go on to the next section at your own pace.

5. A It is reasonable to conclude that the author mentioned Cindy because it would strengthen the argument that birth order affects personality traits. The passage states that oldest children are more responsible and perform better in school. Since Cindy was on the Dean’s list (good academic performance) and did her chores as a child (a sign of responsibility), it is reasonable to assume that Cindy was an oldest child.
Understanding the latest test-taking strategies is essential to preparing you for what you will expect on the exam. A test taker has to not only understand the material that is being covered on the test, but also must be familiar with the strategies that are necessary to properly utilize the time provided and get through the test without making any avoidable errors. Test Prep Books has drilled down the top test-taking tips for you to know.
Master the ASVAB is our 5th best overall prep book on our list of the best ASVAB prep books. One positive about this review guide is the diagnostic test. This diagnostic test is very good for helping you to figure out your weaknesses. When you know your weaknesses you can focus your preparation on those things that you can improve to get a higher score on the exam. This really allows you to save time studying since you don't need to practice the topics that you already have a good grasp of.
The ASVAB is one of the most widely used aptitude tests in the world. The intent of the ASVAB test battery is to assess a candidate's potential for future success in the U.S. Military. Because of the nature of the test, the ASVAB can also be used to give a candidate valuable information about both military and civilian career choices that they may be suited for.
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Using the right ASVAB study guide is an important factor in determining how well you will do on the exam. Each branch of the U.S. Military requires you take an ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) exam.  Your scores on the ASVAB determine not only your entrance into the military, but also your job, advancement opportunities, and potential salary.  The ASVAB exam consists of questions in ten different areas, but in general, the exam is measuring your aptitude in four key areas: Math, Verbal, Science and Technical, and Spatial.  To efficiently prepare for your ASVAB exam, check out our recommended study guides, our free practice exams, our ASVAB flash cards, and our ASVAB study tips.
Pay close attention to all numbers and figures mentioned within the body of the paragraph. Identify these numbers, set them aside, and identify which of the numbers are relevant and which of the numbers are tossed in for the purpose of throwing you off or misleading you. While paying attention to the numbers, also pay attention to the order. Identifying a 7 and a 9 as the two elements of a word problem is only effective if you are able to correctly identify the proper sequence of the numbers. 9-7 and 7-9 yield two very different results and may be the difference between passing and failing a test.
AFQT (Armed Force Qualification Test) score: This score is reported in the form of a percentile rank and is calculated by adding the scores that you have received for the 4 sub-tests, viz, Mathematics Knowledge, Arithmetic Reasoning, Paragraph Comprehension and Word Knowledge. The total score that you receive for these sub-tests is then compared to the scores that other candidates taking a similar format of the test have received. Then you receive a percentile rank that can range anywhere from 1 to 99. For example, if you receive a rank of 45 percentile then you have scored more than 45 students, but 55 students have scored more than you.
The Kaplan guide has everything I needed to prepare myself for the exam. The book was a great help for refreshing my memory in math and English for the test. Timing yourself on the practice tests is also a great way to make sure you are ahead of the game and never worry about time in the actual test. This is one of the best study guides I have ever seen or used but be prepared to spend time doing the work. As I said it will take hours to go through the material and learn what you need. I believed this book had a direct result in scoring an AFQT of 99. Excellent Book!
AFQT (Armed Force Qualification Test) score: This score is reported in the form of a percentile rank and is calculated by adding the scores that you have received for the 4 sub-tests, viz, Mathematics Knowledge, Arithmetic Reasoning, Paragraph Comprehension and Word Knowledge. The total score that you receive for these sub-tests is then compared to the scores that other candidates taking a similar format of the test have received. Then you receive a percentile rank that can range anywhere from 1 to 99. For example, if you receive a rank of 45 percentile then you have scored more than 45 students, but 55 students have scored more than you.
The multiples of a number are the set of numbers formed by multiplying a number by other numbers.  For example, the first five multiples of 3 are {3, 6, 9, 12, 15}.  The least common multiple of two numbers is the smallest number that both numbers factor into evenly.  The first five multiples of of 4 are {4, 8, 12, 16, 20} making the least common multiple of 3 and 4 equal to 12.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB, scores are a part of what determines your ability to enlist in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. Your ASVAB score includes your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. For high school graduates, the required score is usually in the lower 30s, while those with a GED are usually required to score at least a 50. A "good" score for those who have graduated high school is considered to be a 35. However, each branch has its own minimum score necessary for enlistment, and the higher you score, the more jobs you will be qualified for in your branch of service.
In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.

The various armed forces adopted all of those aspects in 1976. At that point in time, the test was in its written form rather than today’s more common form (computerized test format). The written form covers all of the previously mentioned areas as well, which is why both forms are still available. All-in-all that answers the question concerning the intention of the test.
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