The Mechanical Comprehension section of the ASVAB practice test measures your understanding of basic mechanical principles and mechanisms. You may be asked why an intake valve on a pump opens when the piston goes down, or what direction friction is going when shown a diagram of a skier. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 20 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 19 minutes.
My son wants to serve in the military. He graduates this May from HS. He’s taken a practice ASVAB at school along with others wanting to join. He’s very bright and is a B student at at his school and knows the class material. However, he didn’t test well on the ASFAB pretest at school with only a 16. His concern is that he won’t get in the military and is worried he won’t be able to serve in some military capacity. Any ideas on how we can help him? Thanks!
If you are pressed for time, it may be worthwhile to look into future ASVAB test dates in order to plan ahead in case you get a poor score on your upcoming ASVAB test. You can check with your high school counselor or your military recruiter to make sure that you will be eligible to take future tests along with your planned upcoming test date in the event that you get a bad ASVAB score.
The AFQT score is the most important ASVAB score, because it determines if you can enlist in the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army also converts the ASVAB test scores into 10 other composite score areas known as "line scores" that determine what MOS an individual may qualify for. Listed below are the parts of the ASVAB that affect your AFQT test scores and each of the ten line scores.
The AFQT score is a percentile ranking between 1 and 99 that shows where your score is placed in relation to others. For example, if you score a 54 on the AFQT, this means that you scored as well as or better than 54% of other recruits. If you are not satisfied with your score and wish to retake the test to improve your chances at getting selected, you must wait a month before taking it again. You can retake the test as many times as you want, but after 3 attempts the waiting period jumps to 6 months.
It is critical to know how ASVAB scores are calculated and what they are used for.  The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) tests are used to identify whether a candidate is qualified to enlist in a particular branch of the U.S. Military.  The ASVAB test is also used to determine which military jobs (referred to as MOS for Military Occupational Specialties) a candidate is best suited for.  ASVAB scores can also be used by test takers to help explore which careers they may be a good fit for them – whether they go into the military or not. While no one officially passes or fails the ASVAB, each branch of the military has specific minimum scores required for enlistment.  Your scores also affect the type of military job, enlistment bonuses and salary you are eligible for.

The Auto and Shop Information section of the ASVAB test measures your knowledge of automobile technology and basic repairs. The shop questions are about basic wood and metals. For example, you will encounter questions such as “Shock absorbers on a car connect the axle to the: wheel, chassis, drive shaft, or exhaust pipe?” You may be asked what sanding blocks are used for, followed by the following choices: preventing high spots and ridges on sanded surfaces, preventing dirt from collecting on the sandpaper, stretching the length of sandpaper, or prolonging the use of the sandpaper. The CAT-ASVAB test has two parts: the first part covering automotive material asks 11 questions in 7 minutes; the 11 shop information questions are allotted 6 minutes. The paper-and-pencil version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.


Every concept explanation is immediately followed by the practice problems. This really helps you a lot in checking and backtracking your weak points since you can go back and forth between the questions and the subjects. You can practice and review at the same time, a great time saver. It also helps you to be able to go back into the chapter and look up where you were wrong. Make sure to reread the section if you are missing a lot of questions in certain sections. This makes it easy to see what your secret weaknesses are.
The CAT-ASVAB is an adaptive test which means the test adapts to the ability of the test-taker. It is possible to administer a shorter test this way than with the pencil and paper test. When you complete a subsection of the test, you can then move onto the next section of the test without having to wait for an administrator. Subsections are still timed however and on average it takes about 1 ½ hours to complete the computer ASVAB.
For the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy a retest will only be authorized if a recruit's test scores expire, their scores are too low, if the recruiter feels your scores do not match your qualifications, or in the event of special circumstances that bar a recruit from taking the test. A retest will not be authorized to simply increase an already successful score in order to qualify for particular occupations or for enlistment bonuses. Usually, recruits with successful scores holding a job reservation or who are enrolled in the Delay Entry Program (DEP) are not eligible to retest.
To enlist in the Air Force, which is considered the most restrictive branch of the military when it comes to AFQT scores, you must have a minimum AFQT score of 36 if you have a high school school diploma. If you have a GED, you must score a minimum of 65. Less than1 percent of people who enlist in the Air Force each year have a GED instead of a high school diploma. In rare cases, the Air Force will accept a minimum score of 31, if an applicant has a special skill that the Air Force deems necessary, such as speaking a particular foreign language. Again, like in any branch of the military, your score not only determines your ability to enlist, it also determines your qualification of the various jobs within that branch.
Education Requirements – It’s seeming impossible to get into the Air Force without graduating from high school with a diploma. The chances are extremely slim for people who only get a GED instead of a high school diploma. Only about 1/2 of 1%, or 0.5%, of all annual Air Force enlistments have only a GED. If a GED holder is trying to enlist, that person must score a 50 or higher on the AFQT. On the up side, if a recruit has college credits under their belt then the Air Force allows a higher enlistment rank!
In addition, your scores on the other ASVAB composite tests will determine your career field or military occupation eligibility. Since enlistment bonuses are usually tied to your choice of occupations, the better the score, the more opportunities you have. But keep in mind, it is impossible to literally "ace" the ASVAB, so your goal should be to simply do your best.
Air Force recruits must score at least 36 points the 99-point ASVAB. The overall ASVAB score is known as the AFQT score, or Armed Forces Qualification Test score. Exceptions may be made, however, for a handful of high school graduates who can score as low as 31. The vast majority, some 70 percent, of those accepted for an Air Force enlistment achieve a score of 50 or above.
Are you thinking about joining the Army, Navy, Marines, or Air Force?  Maybe you want to cook or write or handle explosives. Maybe you want to deal with advanced technology or pilot a drone. Whatever your military dream job, we can help you turn that dream into reality. Here at ASVABTutor, we provide the practice tests and study guides that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
Once you have learned about yourself, you are ready to begin exploring different career options.  Chances for a rewarding career are improved if you select a career field that matches your interests, values, skills, and abilities.  While learning about various careers, you should be constantly asking yourself, “How well does this career match my current interests, values, and abilities?” and “Will this career lead to a lifestyle I want?”

Our ASVAB practice test questions are categorized to help you focus your study. Just like in the real exam, each of our questions will have four possible answers to choose from. The questions are similar to what you can expect on the actual ASVAB exam. After you submit answers to the practice questions, a test score will be presented. In addition, you will be given rationales (explanations) to all of the questions to help you understand any questions you may have gotten wrong.
There are three different versions of the ASVAB: the Computer Adaptive Test (CAT), the Student version, and the Paper & Pencil version. The Student version of the ASVAB is remarkably similar to the Paper & Pencil version, and is typically administered to high school students across the country. For the purposes of this website, we will focus on the CAT and the Paper & Pencil versions exclusively.
One flaw of this review guide is that the summary is not as comprehensive as other prep guides. At only 324 Pages, this prep book does not have enough length to meticulously go through all of the topics. If you are looking for an in-depth rundown you may need to supplement this prep book with another review guide. If you just need a quick overview, however, this guide may be perfect for you.
After adding so much information to the aptitude test, there was a bit of difficulty interpreting the test results. In addition to that, a vast majority of test takers were deemed as being under qualified based on their test results. This is why the percentile change was made. It ensured that a 50% actually correlated with a person doing better than 50% of the test takers. Those revisions have worked hand-in-hand with the preparation of the armed forces.
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