The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.
The AFQT composite score is used by all military branches to determine basic acceptance; however, there are other composite scores that are calculated by using unique formulas that group the subtests in order to determine the aptitude for a particular type of work. For instance, to work in Electronics Repair within the Marine Corp, the EL score, or Electronics Repair composite score, would be calculated. This score consists of the subtests for Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, and General Science. To become an Unmanned Aerial System Avionics Technician, the individual must have an EL score of 105, while it would take 115 to become an Aviation Logistics Information Management and Support Specialist.
CliffNotes has a pre-test and post-test for every section in the book including numerous practice problems for each type of math question. By the time you finish this book, you will have covered hundreds of math problems including some of the most common problems found on standardized tests. Although this book was not written exclusively for the ASTB many of the questions found
The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
Kaplan ASVAB Premier 2017 with 6 Practice Tests: Book + Videos + Online + Mobile. The Kaplan ASVAB study guide is the biggest and most complete option that you can buy. The 2017 version includes 6 practice tests with more than 1,000 questions. Three of the practice tests are in the book and the other 3 are available online. Access to an online quiz bank is also included. It also comes with access to online videos that offer test-taking advice with a focus on the AFQT portion of the exam.
Scoring high on the ASVAB will require preparation and study. Don’t miss out on preparing for this important test — let us help prepare you for the ASVAB. Learn more about the ASVAB test, study with our test prep materials and take our practice test. Our website will give you an idea of how well you’ll score, identifies areas that you may need to work on and suggests resources and techniques that you can use. Additionally, check out the books that we recommend – these are the highest rated ASVAB preparation books available. Check out our ASVAB Study Guides. Interested in college? Check out our College Scholarships Guide, search over 20 million scholarships and grants.
Detailed answer explanations are also included for each question. It may sound obvious, but you have to know which questions you missed (and more importantly why you missed them) to be able to avoid making the same mistakes again when you take the real test. That's why our ASVAB Practice Questions include answer keys with detailed answer explanations. These in-depth answer explanations will allow you to better understand any questions that were difficult for you or that you needed more help to understand.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB test--also known as the AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test). This is the score used by the recruiter to determine a potential recruit’s enlistment eligibility, assign a recruit to a military jobs, and aid students in career exploration. The AFQT is actually a subset of the ASVAB - only with scores of four of the ten test sections calculated.
Here at ASVABTutor, we provide comprehensive study guides for each section of the ASVAB test that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery.  The ASVAB exam is a series of multiple-choice questions broken down into 9 subjects with an emphasis on determining your aptitude in four primary areas: Math, Verbal, Science and Technical, and Spatial. 
The doppler effect is generated when the source or the observer of sound is moving.  When a sound is approaching an observer its frequency appears to increase as it gets closer and change as it passes the observer and moves away.  This characteristic is what makes radar and sonar effective in indicating the size of and distance to an object via measuring reflected sound.
Extra back-to-basics practice that has helped thousands of recruits to qualify for the armed forces. Thousands of military recruits need extra help to pass the ASVAB, or Armed Forces Test and here’s where they can find it! ARCO’s ASVAB Basics offers intensive practice in reading, vocabulary, and mathematics the subjects covered in the four ASVAB subtests that determine whether a recruit qualifies for enlistment. Now updated, it features: * Full-length ASVAB subtests for practice * Drills to improve basic academic skills * Complete explanatory answers.
The Arithmetic Reasoning section of the test measures your ability to solve arithmetic word problems. You may be asked questions such as “If the tire of a car rotates at a constant speed of 552 times in 1 minute, how many times will the tire rotate in half an hour?” Therefore, reviewing common math key words associated with each operation is recommended. For example, if you see the key words “in all,” the problem deals with addition. If the problem asks you to “find the difference,” you are being asked to subtract. If a question asks “how many times” per day or week, you know you are dealing with multiplication. If it asks “how many in each,” you should be thinking about division. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 39 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 30 questions in 36 minutes.
Obviously, the most important way to prepare to take the test is to spend plenty of time reviewing practice test questions. Look at questions from all sections of the test, but pay special attention to questions on the Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge sections, which will be used to calculate your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score for enlistment.
For almost a century, the U.S. military has been a pioneer in the field of using aptitude tests to evaluate an individual’s potential for service. The organization also uses the test to determine aptitude for various military occupational specialties (MOS). The use of aptitude tests began during World War I. While the group-administered Army Alpha test measured verbal and numerical ability as well as general knowledge, the Army Beta test was used to evaluate illiterate, unschooled and non-English speaking volunteers and draftees. The Army and Navy General Classifications Tests replaced the Alpha and Beta tests as a means to measure cognitive ability during World War II. The results of these tests, as well as additional classification exams, were used to assign recruits to a particular MOS.
You can take the test as a junior or senior in high school and use the score to enlist, provided that you are at least 17 years old and took the test no earlier than 2 years before you begin enlistment processing. If you are at least 17, you can take the test at a Military Processing Station (MEP) or a satellite Military Entrance Test (MET) location.
Like other military aptitude tests, the ASVAB measures general knowledge from a wide range of categories which can make studying for it seem hopeless at times. Fortunately there are a number of books and study guides out there to help you do well and increase your score. Although this list isn't comprehensive it does include the most helpful and relevant study guides available for succeeding on the ASVAB and, by extension, allowing you to start your career serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. 
While you may want to get the ASVAB over with, it is important to give yourself enough time to prepare and practice for the ASVAB. Once you take the test you will have to wait 30 days before you are eligible to re-take the test if you got a non-passing score, or if you want a better grade. After you retake the test twice, you will need to wait for a 6 month time period before being able to take the test again. For this reason, it is important to pick an ASVAB test date that gives you plenty of time to practice and prepare for each section of the test.
Students are given a Standard Score for each of the subtests. Standard Scores are derived from your Raw Scores (total number of points you receive on each subtest). The Standard Scores are a statistically derived score that typically ranges from 30 and 70 for each subtest. The Standard Scores are created such that a 50 represents a mean (average) score and there is a standard deviation of 10 (implying that 95% of test takers are within two standard deviations, 20 pts, of the mean of 50).
Many students rush to an answer without fully understanding all of the question and each of the potential answers. A good approach is to read the entire question twice before you look at the answers. Also be sure to read each of the answer choices - test writers will often put misleading answers first to lure you in. Be careful, however, not to "over-think" the question! Most of the questions on the ASVAB are straight forward and don't require a "leap of faith" to answer.
Test scores provide only one measure of your skills and abilities.  Test scores and grades, combined with information about your interests, values, skills, and achievements may help you select appropriate occupations for career exploration.  As you explore careers, you can compare your skills with the skill requirements of occupations in which you are interested.

The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
The following is the formula for computing your AFQT score: 2VE + MK + AR. Verbal Expression (VE) is the sum of Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK). Unfortunately it is not possible to compute your AFQT score since the formula requires your subtests' raw scores which the military does not provide on your score sheet; they only report the subtests' standard scores.

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB, scores are a part of what determines your ability to enlist in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. Your ASVAB score includes your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. For high school graduates, the required score is usually in the lower 30s, while those with a GED are usually required to score at least a 50. A "good" score for those who have graduated high school is considered to be a 35. However, each branch has its own minimum score necessary for enlistment, and the higher you score, the more jobs you will be qualified for in your branch of service.
This study guide is what it claims to be…fluff free and comprehensive. Some study guides give you a lot of stuff you don’t really need just to make themselves look thicker and fuller. And then you have to waste a lot of time weeding through it all trying to figure out what’s good and what’s padding. This guide has the information you need and that’s that. It’s really comprehensive, though, and doesn’t leave things out at the same time. Plus, it has some other great tips like study secrets and test mistakes to avoid. And even better yet, none of it costs much! And you get it all in one guide.
The P&P-ASVAB gives you a set number of questions to answer and a set time limit. If you finish a section before your time runs out, you may go back and review your answers and change them if you want to. It’s better to answer all of the questions on the P&P-ASVAB – there is no penalty for guessing because only correct answers are added to make up your final score.

Light is transmitted via waves of different wavelength and frequency (perceived as color). Light is refracted when it passes from one medium into another and different wavelengths of light bend at different angles.  When light is reflected from a surface the angle at which light strikes the surface is always equal to the angle at which it is reflected.
Batteries can be connected in series to provide voltage equal to the sum of their individual voltages with a current equal to the current that a single battery produces.  Connect batteries in parallel to provide current equal to the sum of their individual currents with a voltage equal to the voltage that a single battery produces.  To increase both voltage and current, connect batteries in a series-parallel configuration.
Ecology is the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Regions that share a similar climate and soil type (and, therefore, similar animal and plant life) are called biomes and house a community of species that each belong to a population.  This combination of biome and community make up an ecosystem that consists of predators that utilize other living organisms as food, prey that becomes food to predators, and parasites that lives in or on another organism and takes nutrients from its host.
The Assembling Objects section of the ASVAB practice test measures your ability to determine how an object will look when its parts are put together. You will be shown an illustration of pieces and asked to choose which one, among a selection of finished diagrams, shows how they fit together. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 16 minutes, while the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 15 minutes.
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The following is the formula for computing your AFQT score: 2VE + MK + AR. Verbal Expression (VE) is the sum of Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK). Unfortunately it is not possible to compute your AFQT score since the formula requires your subtests' raw scores which the military does not provide on your score sheet; they only report the subtests' standard scores.
The ASVAB is a multiple choice test and is broken down into eight areas. Each section has its own score, and are combined to come up with your composite score. It’s scored on a percentile basis, so 99 is the highest possible score. Different branches of the military will have different minimum composite scores, and those will vary within each branch by different job. The higher you score, the more jobs and options you’ll qualify for. If you don’t take it in high school, you’ll take the test at your nearest Military Entrance Processing Station, or at an armory or recruiting station. It’s timed, and it takes about three and a half hours to complete.
Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]
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