Mathematical reasoning requires you to focus on all aspects of the word problem, with particular attention to buzzwords indicating the action to take: multiplication, division, etc. Seek out important phrases, such as “difference,” “minus,” and “take away” for subtraction, or “product,” “times,” and “double” for multiplication. Before tackling the question as a whole, look for such buzzwords and identify what process the word problem requires. From there, you can continue to solve the overall equation

In addition, your scores on the other ASVAB composite tests will determine your career field or military occupation eligibility. Since enlistment bonuses are usually tied to your choice of occupations, the better the score, the more opportunities you have. But keep in mind, it is impossible to literally "ace" the ASVAB, so your goal should be to simply do your best.
The military has used the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) for the last 40 years to place soldiers into careers and to determine whether or not a soldier could follow directions and be trained. The military says the ASVAB is a useful measure of future academic and occupational success in the military -- if a solider can read it. Testers must understand the ASVAB’s long list of abbreviations if the test itself is to be used to its best advantage.

There are three different versions of the ASVAB: the Computer Adaptive Test (CAT), the Student version, and the Paper & Pencil version. The Student version of the ASVAB is remarkably similar to the Paper & Pencil version, and is typically administered to high school students across the country. For the purposes of this website, we will focus on the CAT and the Paper & Pencil versions exclusively.
The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
If you’re considering joining the military, you’ll need to know about the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB. It’s often given to 11th graders, but anyone joining the military must pass it. It’s used to determine a person’s skills and aptitudes in a variety of subjects, and the results enable the military to place the person in the best possible slot for a person with that particular skill set.
Education Requirements – More people are able to enlist in the Army with only a GED, as opposed to a high school diploma, than any other military branch. Some recruitment years have allowed 15% of recruits to enter without a high school diploma. On the up side, just like the Air Force, if a recruit has college credits under their belt then the Army allows the recruit to enter with a higher enlistment rank! The Army allows recruits with a college degree to enter with a rank as high as E-4, which is higher than the Air Force’s E-3 rank for recruits with only some college credits.
According to the ASVAB testing site, the branches of the military use the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score to place soldiers into training groups. The AFQT score is comprised of four of the ASVAB subtests: the Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). The AFQT score is computed on a percentile score from 1 to 99; the higher the percentile score, the more likely a soldier is to get a military job he wants. In addition, branches of the military use individual subtest scores, such as Auto and Shop, to place soldiers for individual training.

If school district or open-enrollment charter school has entered into a prior contract under which a vocational aptitude test that does not comply with the requirements for an alternative test outlined above, then the school district, open-enrollment charter school, or high school may elect not to provide the ASVAB for the term of the contract. On the expiration of the contract term, the requirements outlined in this letter become applicable to the school district, open-enrollment charter school or high school.


The minimum AFQT score for enlistment in the Army is 31, regardless of whether you have a high school diploma or a GED. Waivers can be used to lower the minimum score enlistment score to 26, if the current recruiting requirements allow. If you want to qualify for incentive programs like the Army College Fund, college loan repayment and monetary enlistment bonuses, you typically need a minimum score of 50.

The Kaplan guide has everything I needed to prepare myself for the exam. The book was a great help for refreshing my memory in math and English for the test. Timing yourself on the practice tests is also a great way to make sure you are ahead of the game and never worry about time in the actual test. This is one of the best study guides I have ever seen or used but be prepared to spend time doing the work. As I said it will take hours to go through the material and learn what you need. I believed this book had a direct result in scoring an AFQT of 99. Excellent Book!


According to the ASVAB testing site, the military has been using one form of test or another since World War I to evaluate potential soldiers and determine who was capable of service, in what jobs they should be placed, and which recruits might make good leaders. The ASVAB was developed in the early 1970s for use by all the military branches, although the Navy gives a variation of a subtest. Every person who enlists in the military takes the ASVAB. In addition, all high school students take the ASVAB, usually during their sophomore or junior years.
Again, we must stress that there is no passing or failing score on the exam. The test is a measure of aptitude and provides percentile rankings to indicate your performance compared to other test takers. However, different branches of the military do have minimum score requirements for enlistment. This means that it’s important to make sure you’re prepared for test day, and that’s where a practice test will prove valuable.
Another big advantage of practice tests is that they are fun. It’s fun to challenge yourself and see what you know. Instead of wondering if you are studying the right things or just wasting your valuable time, good practice tests can help you find out what you need to know while injecting your study time with excitement and competition as you try to outdo yourself each time you take a test.
Once the ASVAB is over, participants are given a score. This score is used by recruiters to determine which branch of the military would be a good fit for a given test-taker. The most important score for the ASVAB for military purposes is the AFQT score. The AFQT score looks at results from the following sections: Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Math Knowledge (MK), and multiplies the Verbal Composite (VE) score by two. This is because the Verbal Composite Score is composed of both the Word Knowledge and the Paragraph Comprehension scores. Each branch of the military requires a different minimum AFQT score for its members. For the army and marines, this number is 31, for the navy 35, the air force 36, and the coast guard 45. Therefore, this test is a crucial part of any military career, and can determine potential jobs and advancement opportunities. Along with advancement opportunities come higher salaries and greater benefits, which makes the ASVAB an essential element for prospective military service personnel at any level.
Understanding the ASVAB score range is to understand standard deviations. The highest score on the ASVAB is a 99 and the lowest score is a one. Scores are based on the mean of all examinees. This is to say that a score of 50 would account for an average score. Each increment of 10 represents a single standard deviation from the mean score. So, for example, a score of 80 would be three standard deviations better than the meanwhile a score of 30 would be two standard deviations lower than the mean score.

Other scores that are taken into account: Although, your high school passing scores or GED scores do not technically form a part of the scores, yet they will be taken into account while your application is being evaluated. For example, if you want to be recruited by the Air Force, then you must have a high school diploma (which you have achieved with a high scores) and an percentile score of 65.
In order to perform well on the ASVAB, you should take a practice test to get an idea of what you’ll encounter on the actual test. Also, completing a practice test will help you to feel more at ease on test day. Reading the test instructions and focusing your full attention on each question are both important steps to take. As you work through the test, avoid spending too much time on a single question. The test has a time limit and you don’t want to fall into the trap of running out of time before you arrive at the end of the test. Taking the time to provide thoughtful answers to test questions allows you to offer a clear picture of your skills and capabilities. Earning a high score on the ASVAB may give you more options when it comes to choosing a specialty.
This advice, though well-intentioned, doesn’t address the needs of some new recruits who are interested in specific career fields but are worried about their test performance-especially in areas related to math comprehension. Potential recruits who feel deficient in math, language, or science skills should have a frank conversation with their recruiter to discuss possible refresher study or even supplemental classes in any self-perceived “problem areas” before taking the test.
You’ll need to bring valid identification (photo ID, SSN card) to be admitted into the ASVAB testing room. Arrive on time— you’ll be turned away and required to reschedule if you are late. Your recruiter may give you a ride to and from the session, but he/she is not permitted in the testing room. You will not need to bring a calculator for the test.
Education Requirements – More people are able to enlist in the Army with only a GED, as opposed to a high school diploma, than any other military branch. Some recruitment years have allowed 15% of recruits to enter without a high school diploma. On the up side, just like the Air Force, if a recruit has college credits under their belt then the Army allows the recruit to enter with a higher enlistment rank! The Army allows recruits with a college degree to enter with a rank as high as E-4, which is higher than the Air Force’s E-3 rank for recruits with only some college credits.
The ASVAB is one of the most widely used aptitude tests in the world. The intent of the ASVAB test battery is to assess a candidate's potential for future success in the U.S. Military. Because of the nature of the test, the ASVAB can also be used to give a candidate valuable information about both military and civilian career choices that they may be suited for.
The ASVAB contains 10 subtests, which are grouped under different qualification areas. The AFQT portion of the test includes Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, and Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. A minimum score of 32 on this portion is required to enlist in the Marine Corp for recruits with a high school diploma, and those with a GED must score 50.
It is critical to know how ASVAB scores are calculated and what they are used for.  The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) tests are used to identify whether a candidate is qualified to enlist in a particular branch of the U.S. Military.  The ASVAB test is also used to determine which military jobs (referred to as MOS for Military Occupational Specialties) a candidate is best suited for.  ASVAB scores can also be used by test takers to help explore which careers they may be a good fit for them – whether they go into the military or not. While no one officially passes or fails the ASVAB, each branch of the military has specific minimum scores required for enlistment.  Your scores also affect the type of military job, enlistment bonuses and salary you are eligible for.
The ASVAB Career Exploration Program (CEP) , takes approximately three hours, covers eight subjects and is composed of 200 questions. The ASVAB CEP is currently a pen and paper test. If it is offered by their school, high school students can take the ASVAB CEP test in grades 10, 11 and 12. They can only take it at the high school they attend, unless special arrangements are made.

Army.mil says of ASVAB/PiCAT testing, “The ASVAB is usually given in schools by test administrators from the federal government. Schools determine where and when the ASVAB will be given. See your academic advisor for more information. If you’re not currently in school, contact your local recruiter.” Test administration and scheduling procedures are handled differently by each branch of the military.

Below you will find a helpful list of several official full length tests, sample questions, and guides to aid you in your studying for the ASVAB. It is important to remember while these resources may be helpful, they are not exhaustive in detail and will not cover everything found on the test. These guides should be used to familiarize yourself with the content and format of the questions. Click the links below to begin reviewing sample questions and taking your practice tests.


As you go along, keep in mind that the ASVAB practice test is just that: practice. Memorizing these questions and answers will not be very helpful on the actual test because it is unlikely to have any of the same exact questions. If you only know the right answers to the sample questions, you won’t be prepared for the real thing. Study the concepts until you understand them fully, and then you’ll be able to answer any question that shows up on the test.

It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.
Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.
The sections are as follows, General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and a Verbal Expression score influenced by the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension sections of the test. Those looking to join the Navy also complete a Coding Speed test.

In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
Though you may be intimidated by studying 5-7 nights a week, remember that this is only for a few months. The investment you make now in yourself can have great rewards - IF you put in the time! Just be honest with yourself, find out what you need to work on the most, and stick with your schedule! You may also want to set goals, such as "I want to take a practice test and score 80% or better on it within a month." However you choose to study, be consistent, be confident, and you will be successful!
How were you at math in high school? This subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is going to put you to the test. It is filled with questions covering basic high school math. Unfortunately, that means there is a lot for this test to cover, which means you’ll have to do a lot of jumping from one math concept to the next during the course of this subtest. One way to get ready for these rapid switches is to take our practice test – but we’ll talk more about that later. Right now, let’s take a closer look at the Mathematics Knowledge subtest. On the Mathematics Knowledge subtest you will have 24 minutes to answer 25 questions on the paper version of the ASVAB. On the CAT-ASVAB you will have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions. This subtest is counted as part of your Armed Forces Qualification Test score, so you will want to perform as well as you can. A good score on this subtest is also important to qualify for a number of military jobs.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB, scores are a part of what determines your ability to enlist in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. Your ASVAB score includes your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. For high school graduates, the required score is usually in the lower 30s, while those with a GED are usually required to score at least a 50. A "good" score for those who have graduated high school is considered to be a 35. However, each branch has its own minimum score necessary for enlistment, and the higher you score, the more jobs you will be qualified for in your branch of service.
The CAT-ASVAB is a multiple choice computer test consisting of ten subtests totaling 145 questions with an allotted time of 153 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours. The test will be adaptive meaning each question will be adapted to the skill level of the examinee based on their previous answers. The overwhelming majority of those, currently in the military, took the CAT-ASVAB. The table below provides a breakdown for the CAT-ASVAB:
There are essentially two options when it comes to preparing for this test. First, a person can attempt to reassess all of the information that they learned over a decade by spending hours compiling information. Secondly, a person can find a specially formatted ASVAB practice test that covers all areas of both the written test and computerized test. Clearly, the best choice is the ASVAB practice test. The question becomes “Where does one find an accurate ASVAB practice test?”
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