Nobody wants to be stuck doing something they don’t like. That’s why we urge you to take advantage of our free practice tests and study guides.  Our ASVAB practice tests are formatted exactly like the real ASVAB test and will not only help ensure you have the knowledge to ace the real exam but will also prepare for the actual experience of sitting for the test.
Welcome to ASVAB Practice Tests, a free website that is designed to help you with your ASVAB test prep and review. Each of our free ASVAB practice tests includes challenging practice questions along with detailed explanations. Whether you are preparing for a career in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or the Marines you will need to pass the ASVAB test. If you study for this test it will make a big difference in your final score. Get started now with our free ASVAB practice tests!
Line Scores are composed of the sum of particular combinations of ASVAB subtests. These scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Line Scores are not used to determine eligibility for particular military occupations for officer candidates. Job availability for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS).
Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]
The Word Knowledge subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery measures your vocabulary knowledge. It is one of the four subtests, along with paragraph comprehension, arithmetic reasoning and mathematics knowledge, which are used to determine your Armed Forces Qualification Test score, which in turn determines your eligibility for military service. In addition, a good score on this section is required for a number of military jobs, everything from the obvious journalist position to the maybe not so obvious firefighter position. In other words, this is an important section of the ASVAB to do well and you should be sure to devote sufficient study time to preparing for this subtest. On the Word Knowledge subtest you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions if you take the CAT-ASVAB. If you take the paper ASVAB, you will have 11 minutes to answer 35 questions. On this test, you will be required to both differentiate words based on their spelling and to know what various words mean.
Candidates taking the ASVAB are given a AFQT (Armed Forces Qualifying Test) score which is simply a combination of your scores from four tests (Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge, Word Knowledge, and Paragraph Comprehension). This AFQT score is represented as a percentile (from 1-99) which depicts how well you scored compared to other test takers. For example, if your score is a 57, this means that you scored better than 57% of the other test takers. The AFQT score is used to determine whether you are qualified to enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces.
The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
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