My recruiter told me about this book so I ordered it and got it 3 days later from the Military Bookstore. I got this book and it is awesome. The cd works great and every thing I needed and more to help me was in there. I recommend this book to everyone who is thinking of going in the service and wants to get a real job! GET THIS BOOK AND SCORE HIGH!!!!”
Understanding ASVAB scores is critical if you want to enlist in the U.S. Military and get the military career of your dreams. The ASVAB test is an aptitude test but is not a perfect measure of your knowledge, skills and abilities. Your scores do not guarantee whether you will be successful in a future occupation. Your ASVAB scores, however, need to be good enough to get you into the military branch of your choice.
Paragraph Comprehension tests the ability to obtain information from written material. Students read different types of passages of varying lengths and respond to questions based on information presented in each passage. Concepts include identifying stated and reworded facts, determining a sequence of events, drawing conclusions, identifying main ideas, determining the author's purpose and tone, and identifying style and technique.

First-class levers have the effort and the load on opposite sides of the fulcrum.  The mechanical advantage is (effort)(distance) = (load)(distance). If the distances are equal, then no mechanical advantage exists. If the effort arm is longer than the load arm then the lever will multiply the effort force and if the effort arm is shorter the lever will multiply the effort speed but not the effort force.

Unlike other vocabulary building books which just provide a lengthy list of words and definitions, Barron's organizes 800 words into sentence completion exercises of 10 words at a time which makes integrating these words into your everyday vocabulary much easier than just going down a list and relying on rote memorization. If you have an average vocabulary and and are looking to do well on the ASTB, Barron's Essential Words for the GRE is a great addition to your study material.
According to the ASVAB testing site, the branches of the military use the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score to place soldiers into training groups. The AFQT score is comprised of four of the ASVAB subtests: the Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). The AFQT score is computed on a percentile score from 1 to 99; the higher the percentile score, the more likely a soldier is to get a military job he wants. In addition, branches of the military use individual subtest scores, such as Auto and Shop, to place soldiers for individual training.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is one of the most widely used multiple-aptitude test batteries in the world. It was originally designed to predict success in military occupations and is used today to help both those considering entering the military (mostly high school-aged students, but also anyone who is eligible to enlist) as well as those not interested in military service (who comprise the majority of current ASVAB test takers) what sort of career may be the best fit for them. Scores from the ASVAB can be used when enlisting in the military. Students interested in taking the ASVAB should check with their high school to find out when and if the ASVAB will be offered at their school. If it is not offered, students should meet with their guidance counselor to determine if it is possible to schedule a testing session in the future. There is no cost to take the ASVAB.
The ASVAB was created in 1968. By 1976, all branches of the military began using this test. In 2002, the test underwent many revisions, but its main goal of gauging a person’s basic skills remained the same. Today, there is a computerized version of the test as well as a written version. The Department of Defense developed this test and it’s taken by students in thousands of schools across the country. It is also given at Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS).
The sections are as follows: General Science-25 questions of life, earth, and physical sciences. Arithmetic Reasoning-30 questions involving basic math. Word Knowledge-35 questions on vocabulary and synonyms. Paragraph Comprehension-15 questions testing your reading and comprehension skills. Mathematics Knowledge-25 questions on math concepts and how to use them. Electronics Information-20 questions on basic electronic principles. Auto and Shop Information-25 questions about cars, both maintaining and repairing them, and working with wood and metal. Mechanical Comprehension-25 questions on the properties of different materials, and mechanical principles.
We hope you find our study guides useful as you begin preparing to take the ASVAB! If you’re social like we are, please reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest. We’d love to answer your questions, get your feedback, or just hear more about your thoughts on the ASVAB or your intended branch of service. Good luck studying and congrats as you take this exciting first step towards your military career!
A military recruiter determines if the candidate is a possible recruit. A recruiter will ask about marital status, health, education, drug use, and arrest record. It is important for the candidate to be upfront and truthful when answering questions. Once the recruiter has determined the individual is qualified for additional processing, the ASVAB is scheduled. A physical examination may also be conducted at the time of the test. 
There are nine different test areas as part of the ASVAB: general science, arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, mathematics knowledge, electronics information, auto and shop information, assembling objects, and mechanical comprehension. The paragraph comprehension test area contains the fewest questions with 15. The word knowledge test area contains the most questions with 35. All other sections contain 20, 25, or 30 questions. Taking numerious ASVAB practice tests is recommended for test day success.
My student and I like how there are videos in between. This allows him to visually see and hear about the information in a different way. It breaks up the book and makes it more interesting. I also like the setup of the book. So far, he has taken the Word Knowledge practice test after reviewing and received a score of 32/35, which seems to be a very good score. He wants to join the National Guard but did not score high enough on the ASVAB the two times he took the test previously. This study guide seems to really be helping him with the secrets and tools to achieve a higher score.
Once you've received your free test results, we'll provide a custom list of video lessons that focuses on the concepts you need to study most. You'll learn from expert instructors who have crafted engaging video lessons, and you can test your knowledge with lesson quizzes. The ASVAB courses cover only material that you'll encounter on the ASVAB, so you'll know that you're focusing on the topics that will have the biggest impact on your score. Topical chapter exams will further help you solidify your understanding of important terms, concepts and formulas from the course. And you'll always stay on track with our custom study schedule, which keeps you on track with reminders of what and when to study.
Barron's ASVAB is our 2nd overall prep book on our list of the best practice books. One strong point of Barron's is that the theory review and explanations are very detail-oriented and thorough. This thoroughness really helps you to absorb everything that you need to know for the exam. Learning from your mistakes is crucial, and this review guide really allows you to do just that.
After a candidate has completed the ASVAB they must wait one calendar month before retaking the exam. An additional calendar month must pass before retesting a second time. Six calendar months must pass before retaking the test a third time. The scores received from the ASVAB may be used for enlistment for up to two years from the initial test date. 

Senate Bill (SB) 1843 (85th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 2017) authorizes that each school year, each school district and open-enrollment charter school is required to provide students in grades 10 through 12 an opportunity to take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test and consult with a military recruiter. School districts and open-enrollment charter schools must:


The Armed Forces Classification Test (AFCT) is a paper-based test that is administered to Servicemembers by a test administrator in the command's Educational Services Office for those who desire to increase their score in order to reclassify to a different rating/program. The AFCT is a version of the ASVAB, and it is administered in the same manner as the ASVAB's paper-version.
To enlist in the Air Force, which is considered the most restrictive branch of the military when it comes to AFQT scores, you must have a minimum AFQT score of 36 if you have a high school school diploma. If you have a GED, you must score a minimum of 65. Less than1 percent of people who enlist in the Air Force each year have a GED instead of a high school diploma. In rare cases, the Air Force will accept a minimum score of 31, if an applicant has a special skill that the Air Force deems necessary, such as speaking a particular foreign language. Again, like in any branch of the military, your score not only determines your ability to enlist, it also determines your qualification of the various jobs within that branch.
To enlist in the Air Force, which is considered the most restrictive branch of the military when it comes to AFQT scores, you must have a minimum AFQT score of 36 if you have a high school school diploma. If you have a GED, you must score a minimum of 65. Less than1 percent of people who enlist in the Air Force each year have a GED instead of a high school diploma. In rare cases, the Air Force will accept a minimum score of 31, if an applicant has a special skill that the Air Force deems necessary, such as speaking a particular foreign language. Again, like in any branch of the military, your score not only determines your ability to enlist, it also determines your qualification of the various jobs within that branch.
The format is different depending on where you take the test. At MEP sites, the test is computer-based and is given in an adaptive format. This means that questions may get easier or harder based on your answers to previous questions. The ASVAB-CT does not allow you to review or change your answers, which some recruits may find difficult, but it has some advantages over the pencil-and-paper version given at satellite MET locations. Overall, the exam takes only about 1 ½ hours to complete, doing each section at your own pace – and you can see your scores as soon as you finish taking the test. The pencil-and-paper version takes longer (3-4 hours total time), is not adaptive, and has a time limit for each subtest. You are allowed to change your answers for each subtest before moving on to the next one, but only before the time limit is reached for that subtest. In addition, scores must be processed manually and so they are not available for a few days – although a preliminary AFQT score will be calculated and given to your recruiter once you have completed the test.
According to the ASVAB testing site, the military has been using one form of test or another since World War I to evaluate potential soldiers and determine who was capable of service, in what jobs they should be placed, and which recruits might make good leaders. The ASVAB was developed in the early 1970s for use by all the military branches, although the Navy gives a variation of a subtest. Every person who enlists in the military takes the ASVAB. In addition, all high school students take the ASVAB, usually during their sophomore or junior years.

AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
The Assembling Objects subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is designed to measure your ability for visualizing spatial relationships. In this section of the ASVAB you will be required to view pieces of an object and then determine how those pieces fit together. If you’re asking yourself why this ability is important, the answer is because good spatial skills allow people to figure out maps and interpret graphs and technical drawings. For the Assembling Objects subtest you will 15 minutes to solve 16 problems on the CAT-ASVAB test and 16 minutes to solve 25 questions on the paper version of the ASVAB.

The Arithmetic Reasoning section of the ASVAB test focuses on word problems and delivers mathematical questions and equations in a format that must be synthesized. These may not only be simple questions involving basic multiplication, but may also be as complex as completing a physics equation listed in paragraph or word-block format. When deconstructing these word problems, pay close attention to all aspects of the question, including all numbers mentioned, buzzwords, and the format of the paragraph itself. The following pointers will give you a more in-depth analysis of each component of word problems.
The ASVAB test is administered to potential military recruits to help determine which branch of service and which military jobs they will be best suited for. It is not a test of intelligence and is administered only in English. The test consists of nine subjects: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, and Assembling Objects.
The ASVAB Electronics Information subtest covers electricity principles and electronic devices, including radios, televisions, magnets, motors, transistors and much, much more. For this subtest, you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions when you take the CAT-ASVAB. You will 9 minutes to answer 20 questions on the pencil and paper version of the ASVAB test. The Electronics Information subtest covers a variety of electrical-related subjects including: You will need to know major electrical concepts, including how to use conductors, currents, circuits and insulators, among other things. You’ll also need to know various types of conductors and insulators and how effective they are. And that’s not all, you’ll also need to know different ways electricity can be used, the different types of electrical current and more.
Pay close attention to all numbers and figures mentioned within the body of the paragraph. Identify these numbers, set them aside, and identify which of the numbers are relevant and which of the numbers are tossed in for the purpose of throwing you off or misleading you. While paying attention to the numbers, also pay attention to the order. Identifying a 7 and a 9 as the two elements of a word problem is only effective if you are able to correctly identify the proper sequence of the numbers. 9-7 and 7-9 yield two very different results and may be the difference between passing and failing a test.
Nobody wants to be stuck doing something they don’t like. That’s why we urge you to take advantage of our free practice tests and study guides.  Our ASVAB practice tests are formatted exactly like the real ASVAB test and will not only help ensure you have the knowledge to ace the real exam but will also prepare for the actual experience of sitting for the test.
Mometrix Academy is a completely free practice test resource provided by Mometrix Test Preparation. If you find benefit from our efforts here, check out our premium quality ASVAB study book to take your studying to the next level. Just click the ASVAB study guide link below. Your purchase also helps us make even more great, free practice questions for test-takers.

The paper version of the ASVAB is similar to the CAT-ASVAB, but with a few notable differences. The difficulty of the tests are the same; however, the auto and shop information subtests are combined into one section, and the amount of questions and the time available for the subtests are different. On the paper version you will have 149 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours, to complete 225 questions. The table below provides a breakdown for the Paper & Pencil ASVAB:
Military requirements for a minimum ASVAB score vary for each military branch. Please keep in mind that the overall ASVAB score is known as the AFQT score, or Armed Forces Qualification Test score. The AFQT is made up of your test results from the Mathematics Knowledge, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension and Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. For the purposes of this article, “AFQT” and “ASVAB” are used interchangeably because the minimum AFQT score military requirements are often called the ASVAB score.
I will highly recomend this study guide to anyone in need of help studying for the ASVAB, I have only had it for a few days and I already see a tremendous amount of improvement in my practice tests. This book gives helpful tips on test taking which has always been something I’ve struggled with, but not anymore! Throughout this study guide you get help with every part of the ASVAB and it has a practice test for each part, which is extremely helpful to me because it shows me what I retained well and what I need to work on still. This study guide is the best tool I have used in aid of my ASVAB test preparation, and I know my score will reflect highly due to the ASVAB SECRETS Study Guide.
This study guide for the ASVAB is by far the BEST. It’s very informative. It has strategies and techniques to attack the exam that will make you feel more confident. I’m very glad to have this book. Awesome Investment!! This book is by far the BEST guide to have. Its very informative and it has different techniques to tackle the ASVAB. It even includes a BONUS website that is also very helpful.
Education Requirements – Recruits without a high school diploma are practically ineligible to enlist. The Marine Corps do not allow more than 5% of recruits to enlist without a high school diploma, and those recruits must have a GED. Those with only a GED must score at least a 50 on the AFQT to be considered. As with the other branches, the Marine Corps provides advanced enlistment rank for recruits that have some college experience (i.e. credits). However, the Marines are less generous to recruits with some college credit as they only allow the maximum advanced rank of E-2 upon enlistment.
The ASVAB Career Exploration Program provides tools developed by the Department of Defense (DoD) to help high school and post-secondary students across the nation learn more about career exploration and planning. Since the mid-1990’s, the ASVAB Career Exploration Program has provided high quality, cost-free career exploration and planning materials and services annually to approximately 14,000 of the nation’s high schools. You can prepare by taking ASVAB Practice Tests – many of which are available online.
As you go along, keep in mind that the ASVAB practice test is just that: practice. Memorizing these questions and answers will not be very helpful on the actual test because it is unlikely to have any of the same exact questions. If you only know the right answers to the sample questions, you won’t be prepared for the real thing. Study the concepts until you understand them fully, and then you’ll be able to answer any question that shows up on the test.
AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
8. Use the following passage to answer questions 8 and 9. Harry went to the drugstore and purchased band-aids, pain relievers and cold medication. He also picked up two prescriptions. He then stopped by the hardware store and bought nails, screws and a first aid kit. Finally, he went to the grocery store and bought orange juice, flour and eggs. Where did Harry buy the first aid kit?
The results of each test are shown as soon as you complete it. You’ll see what you got right and how it compares to other people who took the same test. Feedback is also visual, showing your percentile and success on each question compared to others. The answers to each ASVAB practice test question are explained as well. The free ASVAB example questions are both tools for learning and for comparing your results to your own previous attempts, and to the scores of your classmates and peers. You can use the scores as a baseline and to identify your weaknesses. With this information, it becomes easier to focus your study time and effort on areas that need improvement.
A capacitor stores an electric charge using two parallel plates with a a nonconducting material (dielectric) between them.  Capacitors can provide a fixed or variable capacitance in a circuit.  Capacitance is measured in farads (F) and depends on the surface area of the plates (larger means higher capacitance), their distance apart (closer means higher capacitance), and the type of dielectric.
The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.
Line scores, which are also known as composite scores, may be used to determine if an applicant would be a good fit for specific careers in a branch of the military. For example, an acceptable Skilled Technical (ST) score may be required for some positions in the Army. The ST score is determined by an individual's scores on the Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), General Science (GS), Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK) subtests of the ASVAB.
The following is the formula for computing your AFQT score: 2VE + MK + AR. Verbal Expression (VE) is the sum of Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK). Unfortunately it is not possible to compute your AFQT score since the formula requires your subtests' raw scores which the military does not provide on your score sheet; they only report the subtests' standard scores.
Composite Scores are sometimes referred to as “line scores”, “aptitude area scores”, or “MOS scores”. These scores are derived by adding different combinations of the sub test standard scores. Composite scores are used by the different branches of the U.S. Armed Services to determine which military jobs (or Military Occupational Specialities/MOS) may be the best fit for you. These composite scores are only one factor in determining which military job is right for you. The recruiter will also use job availability, physical and medical qualifications, and eligibility for security clearance as additional factors. Each branch of the service also defines their own composite scores and eligibility requirements. Some of these definitions and requirements are shown below:

For the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy a retest will only be authorized if a recruit's test scores expire, their scores are too low, if the recruiter feels your scores do not match your qualifications, or in the event of special circumstances that bar a recruit from taking the test. A retest will not be authorized to simply increase an already successful score in order to qualify for particular occupations or for enlistment bonuses. Usually, recruits with successful scores holding a job reservation or who are enrolled in the Delay Entry Program (DEP) are not eligible to retest.
Like other military aptitude tests, the ASVAB measures general knowledge from a wide range of categories which can make studying for it seem hopeless at times. Fortunately there are a number of books and study guides out there to help you do well and increase your score. Although this list isn't comprehensive it does include the most helpful and relevant study guides available for succeeding on the ASVAB and, by extension, allowing you to start your career serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. 
The ASVAB is utilized by every branch of the armed forces for vetting enlisted applicants, and is used by the US Army, Marine Corps, and the Coast Guard for selecting officer applicants. If you want to serve your country, you will more than likely have to take the ASVAB. Below you will find all you need to know: a breakdown of the test format, scores, and samples questions and answers; frequently asked questions and helpful product recommendations for all your study needs. Good Luck!
Kaplan ASVAB Premier is our best overall and best value prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation guides. One major strong suit about Kaplan's is that it has a gargantuan amount of practice problems. With over 1,800 practice problems and 6 full-length practice tests, you should never run out of questions to practice with. This repetition will really prepare you for exam day.

Ready to start preparing for the ASVAB? Take our free, 15-question ASVAB practice test on Study.com. Each free practice test comes with a diagnostic report of your strengths and weaknesses, so you'll know what to study next. After establishing a high-level understanding of what you need to focus on, become a Study.com member and gain access to custom ASVAB study guides and additional practice tests!
Are you thinking about joining the Army, Navy, Marines, or Air Force?  Maybe you want to cook or write or handle explosives. Maybe you want to deal with advanced technology or pilot a drone. Whatever your military dream job, we can help you turn that dream into reality. Here at ASVABTutor, we provide the practice tests and study guides that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
Are you thinking about joining the Army, Navy, Marines, or Air Force?  Maybe you want to cook or write or handle explosives. Maybe you want to deal with advanced technology or pilot a drone. Whatever your military dream job, we can help you turn that dream into reality. Here at ASVABTutor, we provide the practice tests and study guides that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).

This will show you exactly what your weak areas are, and where you need to devote more study time. Ask yourself why each of these questions gave you trouble. Was it because you didn’t understand the material? Was it because you didn’t remember the vocabulary? Do you need more repetitions on this type of question to build speed and confidence? Dig into those questions and figure out how you can strengthen your weak areas as you go back to review the material.
There are nine sections on the exam: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects, and Verbal Expression. The time limits for each section range from 10 – 36 minutes; the entire exam takes three hours.
Unlike enlisted applicants, officer candidates are judged solely on their General-Technical line score and not their AFQT score. Remember, the General-Technical score is comprised of the sum of Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, and the Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. The GT score requirement for prospective officers for each branch is detailed below. Note, the Air Force and the Navy do not use the ASVAB for officer applicants and rely on their own exams. 

The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.
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