Line Scores are composed of the sum of particular combinations of ASVAB subtests. These scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Line Scores are not used to determine eligibility for particular military occupations for officer candidates. Job availability for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS).


After a candidate has completed the ASVAB they must wait one calendar month before retaking the exam. An additional calendar month must pass before retesting a second time. Six calendar months must pass before retaking the test a third time. The scores received from the ASVAB may be used for enlistment for up to two years from the initial test date. 

A military recruiter determines if the candidate is a possible recruit. A recruiter will ask about marital status, health, education, drug use, and arrest record. It is important for the candidate to be upfront and truthful when answering questions. Once the recruiter has determined the individual is qualified for additional processing, the ASVAB is scheduled. A physical examination may also be conducted at the time of the test. 
For the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy a retest will only be authorized if a recruit's test scores expire, their scores are too low, if the recruiter feels your scores do not match your qualifications, or in the event of special circumstances that bar a recruit from taking the test. A retest will not be authorized to simply increase an already successful score in order to qualify for particular occupations or for enlistment bonuses. Usually, recruits with successful scores holding a job reservation or who are enrolled in the Delay Entry Program (DEP) are not eligible to retest.
Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and Mathematics Knowledge (MK). Scores on the AFQT are used to determine your eligibility for enlistment in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps. The other six test scores on the ASVAB tests are used to determine the best job for you in the military as your grades will demonstrate knowledge, skill, and interest in certain subjects and tasks. 
The Marine Corps requires a minimum AFQT score of 32 for those with a high school diploma and a minimum score of 50 for applicants with a GED. As with the Navy, only 5 to 10 percent of each year's Marine Corps recruitment class has a GED. Like the Navy and Army, a minimum score of 50 is required to qualify for incentive programs, including enlistment bonuses, the Marine Corps College Fund and the Geographic Area of Choice Program.
The four most important sections of the test—Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge-make up your Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT) score. Your AFQT score ranges from 0 to 100 and determines if you are able to enlist in the military and which jobs and programs you may qualify for when you are in.
The one main weakness of this book is that the subject chapters have a lot of fluff and empty space. This really wastes your time because you are learning things or topics that you do not really need to know for the exam. It would be a lot better if all of the paragraphs in the book added value to your preparation time. Because of this, we rank Master the ASVAB as our 5th overall prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation books.
A whopping 91% of the reviewers of this ASVAB study guide on Amazon gave it five stars. The other 9%? Four stars. If you can’t trust Amazon reviewers, who can you trust? The beauty of this simply titled study guide is in the depth of explanations in how the answers are derived, particularly in the mathematics sections where the authors go to great lengths to illustrate the more complex questions.
The ASVAB is utilized by every branch of the armed forces for vetting enlisted applicants, and is used by the US Army, Marine Corps, and the Coast Guard for selecting officer applicants. If you want to serve your country, you will more than likely have to take the ASVAB. Below you will find all you need to know: a breakdown of the test format, scores, and samples questions and answers; frequently asked questions and helpful product recommendations for all your study needs. Good Luck!
The ASVAB was created in 1968. By 1976, all branches of the military began using this test. In 2002, the test underwent many revisions, but its main goal of gauging a person’s basic skills remained the same. Today, there is a computerized version of the test as well as a written version. The Department of Defense developed this test and it’s taken by students in thousands of schools across the country. It is also given at Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS).
The food chain describes the interdependency of the various organisms within a community.  The food chain is made up of producers that make their own food and consumers that cannot produce their own food and feed on producers.  Primary consumers feed directly on producers, secondary consumers feed on primary consumers and producers, and tertiary consumers feed on all organisms lower in the food chain.  Also in the food chain are decomposers like bacteria and fungi which break down all members of the food chain to recycle their organic compounds.
For those who are interested in enlisting in the military, they are screened using the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), which is comprised of a subset of scores from the ASVAB. Successfully passing the AFQT is not the sole requirement for enlisting but is one of the qualifications that must be met. There are various requirements for the different branches of the military and those interested are encouraged to contact recruiters to obtain more information about requirements specific to that branch.
Again, the ASVAB is a wide-ranging exam covering many different areas. The designers of ASVAB practice tests, at least the high quality ones, know this and have spent time researching past tests to come up with practice tests that feature questions covering areas commonly tested for on the real exam. Thus, taking practice tests is a great way to focus on the material that matters most and avoid wasting your time studying content that likely won’t be on the test.
Auto and Shop Information tests aptitude for automotive maintenance and repair, and wood and metal shop practices. The test covers several areas commonly included in most high school auto and shop courses, such as automotive components, automotive systems, automotive tools, troubleshooting and repair, shop tools, building materials, and building and construction procedures.
McGraw-Hill’s ASVAB, 3rd Edition: Strategies + 4 Practice Tests. A final option is this ASVAB study guide from McGraw-Hill. The author of this book used to work for the Department of Defense in their ASVAB career program, so she definitely has the inside track on test prep. Includes comprehensive topic reviews, four complete practice tests, and test-taking strategies. And remember, you will take the same test whether you are planning to join the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard.

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is the most widely used multiple-aptitude test battery in the world. As an aptitude test, the ASVAB measures your strengths, weaknesses, and potential for future success. The ASVAB also provides you with career information for various civilian and military occupations and is an indicator for success in future endeavors whether you choose to go to college, vocational school, or a military career.

You should note that the exam is given only in English. This is because all of the documents you will need to reference during your military career are in English. Even if English is not your native language, you should be able to make the cut as long as you study enough. You may need to take another test, the ECL (English Comprehension Level), to make sure that you can read and follow instructions given English if it is not your native language.
This study guide is what it claims to be…fluff free and comprehensive. Some study guides give you a lot of stuff you don’t really need just to make themselves look thicker and fuller. And then you have to waste a lot of time weeding through it all trying to figure out what’s good and what’s padding. This guide has the information you need and that’s that. It’s really comprehensive, though, and doesn’t leave things out at the same time. Plus, it has some other great tips like study secrets and test mistakes to avoid. And even better yet, none of it costs much! And you get it all in one guide.
Every single individual that goes through the enlistment process should excel both mentally and physically. That is the number one principle that has consistently inspired this nation to serve these brave and honorable individuals with unwavering efforts. Those efforts officially came to the forefront when the country as a whole decided to correct perhaps the most significant enlistment related problem (passing the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test). Countless hours of hard work and dedication are currently reflected by the top-of-the-line ASVAB practice tests that this nation offers.
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