You can take the test as a junior or senior in high school and use the score to enlist, provided that you are at least 17 years old and took the test no earlier than 2 years before you begin enlistment processing. If you are at least 17, you can take the test at a Military Processing Station (MEP) or a satellite Military Entrance Test (MET) location.

This is the most recent and updated publication of the infamous, ASVAB FOR DUMMIES. Although slightly more expensive than the original version, the ASVAB FOR DUMMIES PREMIER PLUS comes with the standard three full length practice tests and one year of online access to an additional six practice tests. You will also have access to 300 ASVAB flash cards, and the ability to create your own practice tests to hone in on your weaknesses and rise above them.

Unlike other vocabulary building books which just provide a lengthy list of words and definitions, Barron's organizes 800 words into sentence completion exercises of 10 words at a time which makes integrating these words into your everyday vocabulary much easier than just going down a list and relying on rote memorization. If you have an average vocabulary and and are looking to do well on the ASTB, Barron's Essential Words for the GRE is a great addition to your study material.
The AFQT composite score is used by all military branches to determine basic acceptance; however, there are other composite scores that are calculated by using unique formulas that group the subtests in order to determine the aptitude for a particular type of work. For instance, to work in Electronics Repair within the Marine Corp, the EL score, or Electronics Repair composite score, would be calculated. This score consists of the subtests for Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, and General Science. To become an Unmanned Aerial System Avionics Technician, the individual must have an EL score of 105, while it would take 115 to become an Aviation Logistics Information Management and Support Specialist.

Bar none this is the best study guide available for those who aren't particularly adept at math or haven't taken a math class in a long time. CliffNotes Math Review for Standardized Tests covers everything from arithmetic and algebra to geometry and word problems. This book manages to break down increasingly complicated math problems in such a way that is very easy to understand. 


Depends. Only the US Army, Marine Corps, and the US Coast Guard accept the ASVAB for officer applicants. Prospective officer candidates looking at the Air Force and the Navy do not have to take the ASVAB. Instead prospective USAF and USN officer candidates will take the AFOQT and the ASTB-E. If you are interested in joining the US Coast Guard as an officer, you also have the option of taking the Navy's officer candidate test, the ASTB-E, in lieu of the ASVAB.

The CAT-ASVAB is an adaptive test which means the test adapts to the ability of the test-taker. It is possible to administer a shorter test this way than with the pencil and paper test. When you complete a subsection of the test, you can then move onto the next section of the test without having to wait for an administrator. Subsections are still timed however and on average it takes about 1 ½ hours to complete the computer ASVAB.


Additionally, many ASVAB practice tests have a section explaining the answer choices. It can be tempting to read the explanation and think that you now have a good understanding of the concept. However, an explanation likely only covers part of the question’s broader context. Even if the explanation makes sense, go back and investigate every concept related to the question until you’re positive you have a thorough understanding.
As you go along, keep in mind that the ASVAB practice test is just that: practice. Memorizing these questions and answers will not be very helpful on the actual test because it is unlikely to have any of the same exact questions. If you only know the right answers to the sample questions, you won’t be prepared for the real thing. Study the concepts until you understand them fully, and then you’ll be able to answer any question that shows up on the test.

According to the ASVAB testing site, there are between eight and nine subtests, depending on which version of the ASVAB a soldier takes. On some of the ASVAB tests, the Auto and Shop subtests are combined. The subtests and their abbreviations are General Science (GS), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), Auto Information (AI), Shop Information (SI), Mechanical Comprehension (MC). Each section has between 15 and 35 questions.

Taking the PiCAT exam may, depending on circumstances including scores and other factors, may relieve a new recruit of having to take the ASVAB in a proctored setting. In the past, recruits who were preparing to enter military service at Military Entrance Processing Station would take the ASVAB in a group setting; PiCAT can help new recruits avoid having to retake the test. PiCAT test performance and other factors will determine whether or not the ASVAB has to be taken at MEPS.
Ecology is the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Regions that share a similar climate and soil type (and, therefore, similar animal and plant life) are called biomes and house a community of species that each belong to a population.  This combination of biome and community make up an ecosystem that consists of predators that utilize other living organisms as food, prey that becomes food to predators, and parasites that lives in or on another organism and takes nutrients from its host.
Air Force recruits must score at least 36 points the 99-point ASVAB. The overall ASVAB score is known as the AFQT score, or Armed Forces Qualification Test score. Exceptions may be made, however, for a handful of high school graduates who can score as low as 31. The vast majority, some 70 percent, of those accepted for an Air Force enlistment achieve a score of 50 or above.
If school district or open-enrollment charter school has entered into a prior contract under which a vocational aptitude test that does not comply with the requirements for an alternative test outlined above, then the school district, open-enrollment charter school, or high school may elect not to provide the ASVAB for the term of the contract. On the expiration of the contract term, the requirements outlined in this letter become applicable to the school district, open-enrollment charter school or high school.
According to the ASVAB testing site, the military has been using one form of test or another since World War I to evaluate potential soldiers and determine who was capable of service, in what jobs they should be placed, and which recruits might make good leaders. The ASVAB was developed in the early 1970s for use by all the military branches, although the Navy gives a variation of a subtest. Every person who enlists in the military takes the ASVAB. In addition, all high school students take the ASVAB, usually during their sophomore or junior years.
Understanding the ASVAB score range is to understand standard deviations. The highest score on the ASVAB is a 99 and the lowest score is a one. Scores are based on the mean of all examinees. This is to say that a score of 50 would account for an average score. Each increment of 10 represents a single standard deviation from the mean score. So, for example, a score of 80 would be three standard deviations better than the meanwhile a score of 30 would be two standard deviations lower than the mean score.
Don’t confuse a standard score with the graded-on-a-curve score you may have seen on school tests — where the scores range from 1 to 100 with the majority of students scoring between 70 and 100. With standard scores, the majority score is between 30 and 70. That means that a standard score of 50 is an average score and that a score of 60 is an above-average score.

This study guide is what it claims to be…fluff free and comprehensive. Some study guides give you a lot of stuff you don’t really need just to make themselves look thicker and fuller. And then you have to waste a lot of time weeding through it all trying to figure out what’s good and what’s padding. This guide has the information you need and that’s that. It’s really comprehensive, though, and doesn’t leave things out at the same time. Plus, it has some other great tips like study secrets and test mistakes to avoid. And even better yet, none of it costs much! And you get it all in one guide.
It had sections on the mechanical portion of the ASVAB that were very helpful as well as Mathematical practices that served as a great refresher for me. The strategies were also very helpful and gave me confidence going into the test. After going through the book and taking the practice exams, I feel I was well prepared for the ASVAB test. My score almost doubled from my previous attempt at the test after using this guide.

Focus on the four essential sections, those critical to the AFQT score, first. From the example above, it seems that your verbal abilities are at least OK: you gave yourself a 4 on the Word Knowledge section and a 3 on the Paragraph Comprehension. However, your math skills could use some work – especially with Mathematics Knowledge, as you only have a skill level of 2. This you that you'll have to work extra hard on the math sections.


The ASVAB is a series of timed aptitude tests that are used to classify selected candidates into appropriate job roles as well as ultimately decide the eligibility of candidates for US military service.  In other words, perform poorly on this test and you could severely limit your opportunities in the military or even prevent yourself from serving.
Once the ASVAB is over, participants are given a score. This score is used by recruiters to determine which branch of the military would be a good fit for a given test-taker. The most important score for the ASVAB for military purposes is the AFQT score. The AFQT score looks at results from the following sections: Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Math Knowledge (MK), and multiplies the Verbal Composite (VE) score by two. This is because the Verbal Composite Score is composed of both the Word Knowledge and the Paragraph Comprehension scores. Each branch of the military requires a different minimum AFQT score for its members. For the army and marines, this number is 31, for the navy 35, the air force 36, and the coast guard 45. Therefore, this test is a crucial part of any military career, and can determine potential jobs and advancement opportunities. Along with advancement opportunities come higher salaries and greater benefits, which makes the ASVAB an essential element for prospective military service personnel at any level.
Understanding the ASVAB score range is to understand standard deviations. The highest score on the ASVAB is a 99 and the lowest score is a one. Scores are based on the mean of all examinees. This is to say that a score of 50 would account for an average score. Each increment of 10 represents a single standard deviation from the mean score. So, for example, a score of 80 would be three standard deviations better than the meanwhile a score of 30 would be two standard deviations lower than the mean score.
In order to perform well on the ASVAB, you should take a practice test to get an idea of what you’ll encounter on the actual test. Also, completing a practice test will help you to feel more at ease on test day. Reading the test instructions and focusing your full attention on each question are both important steps to take. As you work through the test, avoid spending too much time on a single question. The test has a time limit and you don’t want to fall into the trap of running out of time before you arrive at the end of the test. Taking the time to provide thoughtful answers to test questions allows you to offer a clear picture of your skills and capabilities. Earning a high score on the ASVAB may give you more options when it comes to choosing a specialty.

My son wants to serve in the military. He graduates this May from HS. He’s taken a practice ASVAB at school along with others wanting to join. He’s very bright and is a B student at at his school and knows the class material. However, he didn’t test well on the ASFAB pretest at school with only a 16. His concern is that he won’t get in the military and is worried he won’t be able to serve in some military capacity. Any ideas on how we can help him? Thanks!
According to the ASVAB testing site, there are between eight and nine subtests, depending on which version of the ASVAB a soldier takes. On some of the ASVAB tests, the Auto and Shop subtests are combined. The subtests and their abbreviations are General Science (GS), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), Auto Information (AI), Shop Information (SI), Mechanical Comprehension (MC). Each section has between 15 and 35 questions.
According to the ASVAB testing site, the military has been using one form of test or another since World War I to evaluate potential soldiers and determine who was capable of service, in what jobs they should be placed, and which recruits might make good leaders. The ASVAB was developed in the early 1970s for use by all the military branches, although the Navy gives a variation of a subtest. Every person who enlists in the military takes the ASVAB. In addition, all high school students take the ASVAB, usually during their sophomore or junior years.

The one main weakness of this book is that the subject chapters have a lot of fluff and empty space. This really wastes your time because you are learning things or topics that you do not really need to know for the exam. It would be a lot better if all of the paragraphs in the book added value to your preparation time. Because of this, we rank Master the ASVAB as our 5th overall prep book on our list of the top ASVAB preparation books.
If you are interested in joining the military then the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) may, very well be, the most important test you'll ever have to take. Spanning everything from job selection and pay grade to serving in the branch of your choice or even serving at all, the importance of the ASVAB cannot be overstated. The primary function of the ASVAB is to determine if recruits are qualified for service, and if they possess the skills necessary for receiving training in a variety of military occupations.
There are two parts to the ASVAB: One helps determine which types of positions will be the best fit for you and your skills, and the other is an aptitude test that determines whether or not you're eligible to enlist in the Army, Navy, Air Force or Marine Corps. The aptitude portion, known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), gauges word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, arithmetic reasoning and mathematics knowledge.
The paper-and-pencil version of the test administered at a Mobile Examination Test (MET) site usually takes 3–4 hours. The time needed to take the CAT-ASVAB test can vary. The test is adaptive. If the candidates answer a question correctly, they are given one of increasing difficulty. If the candidates miss a question, they are subsequently given an easier item. This pattern continues until the test is finished. Because of its adaptive nature, the CAT-ASVAB test generally takes about half the time of the paper-and-pencil version.
Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.
The ASVAB Career Exploration Program (CEP) , takes approximately three hours, covers eight subjects and is composed of 200 questions. The ASVAB CEP is currently a pen and paper test. If it is offered by their school, high school students can take the ASVAB CEP test in grades 10, 11 and 12. They can only take it at the high school they attend, unless special arrangements are made.
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