Standard Scores are scores that have a fixed mean and standard deviation in the population of examinees. A Standard Score indicates how many units of the standard deviation a particular score is above or below the mean. In the case of the ASVAB subtests, the mean is set to 50 and the standard deviation is set to 10. Thus, a Standard Score of 40 indicates that the examinee scored 1 standard deviation below the mean. A Standard Score of 70 indicates that the examinee scored 2 standard deviations above the mean. To learn more about how standard scores are derived and used, click here.
On the CAT-ASVAB, you answer one question at a time and can’t go back and change your answers once you’ve submitted them. If you answer a question correctly, you get a more difficult question, but if you are incorrect, you are given an easier question to answer. This is called “adaptive” testing. Once you finish a section you can go on to the next section at your own pace.
5. A It is reasonable to conclude that the author mentioned Cindy because it would strengthen the argument that birth order affects personality traits. The passage states that oldest children are more responsible and perform better in school. Since Cindy was on the Dean’s list (good academic performance) and did her chores as a child (a sign of responsibility), it is reasonable to assume that Cindy was an oldest child.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is the most widely used multiple-aptitude test battery in the world. As an aptitude test, the ASVAB measures your strengths, weaknesses, and potential for future success. The ASVAB also provides you with career information for various civilian and military occupations and is an indicator for success in future endeavors whether you choose to go to college, vocational school, or a military career.

How were you at math in high school? This subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is going to put you to the test. It is filled with questions covering basic high school math. Unfortunately, that means there is a lot for this test to cover, which means you’ll have to do a lot of jumping from one math concept to the next during the course of this subtest. One way to get ready for these rapid switches is to take our practice test – but we’ll talk more about that later. Right now, let’s take a closer look at the Mathematics Knowledge subtest. On the Mathematics Knowledge subtest you will have 24 minutes to answer 25 questions on the paper version of the ASVAB. On the CAT-ASVAB you will have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions. This subtest is counted as part of your Armed Forces Qualification Test score, so you will want to perform as well as you can. A good score on this subtest is also important to qualify for a number of military jobs.

While you may want to get the ASVAB over with, it is important to give yourself enough time to prepare and practice for the ASVAB. Once you take the test you will have to wait 30 days before you are eligible to re-take the test if you got a non-passing score, or if you want a better grade. After you retake the test twice, you will need to wait for a 6 month time period before being able to take the test again. For this reason, it is important to pick an ASVAB test date that gives you plenty of time to practice and prepare for each section of the test.
In addition to the ASVAB's AFQT, each branch has military occupational specialty, or MOS, scores. Combinations of scores from the nine tests are used to determine qualification for a MOS. These combinations are called "aptitude area scores", "composite scores", or "line scores". Each of the five armed services has its own aptitude area scores and sets its own minimum composite scores for each MOS.
Depends. Only the US Army, Marine Corps, and the US Coast Guard accept the ASVAB for officer applicants. Prospective officer candidates looking at the Air Force and the Navy do not have to take the ASVAB. Instead prospective USAF and USN officer candidates will take the AFOQT and the ASTB-E. If you are interested in joining the US Coast Guard as an officer, you also have the option of taking the Navy's officer candidate test, the ASTB-E, in lieu of the ASVAB.
Our full, multiple-choice ASVAB practice tests help you evaluate your understanding of essential test concepts. With these practice tests, you can test your knowledge of different exam sections, such as General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension. We'll show you which answers you get correct and which subjects you've mastered. These practice tests also identify the questions you get wrong, so you can go back to specific course lessons and review the material further. These convenient ASVAB practice tests will help you understand what you know well, what you still need to study and how prepared you are overall.
Focus on the four essential sections, those critical to the AFQT score, first. From the example above, it seems that your verbal abilities are at least OK: you gave yourself a 4 on the Word Knowledge section and a 3 on the Paragraph Comprehension. However, your math skills could use some work – especially with Mathematics Knowledge, as you only have a skill level of 2. This you that you'll have to work extra hard on the math sections.

The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.

Many students rush to an answer without fully understanding all of the question and each of the potential answers. A good approach is to read the entire question twice before you look at the answers. Also be sure to read each of the answer choices - test writers will often put misleading answers first to lure you in. Be careful, however, not to "over-think" the question! Most of the questions on the ASVAB are straight forward and don't require a "leap of faith" to answer.

The majority of people who complete the exam have little intention of entering the military. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the United States military is actually one of the nation’s largest employers. If you’re undecided about your future after high school graduation, taking the test can give you a better picture of your options in both civilian and military life.
Your ASVAB scores determine what jobs you will qualify for in the military. But before you embarrass yourself in front of active duty service members, know that a job in the Army and the Marine Corps is called an MOS, which is an acronym for Military Occupational Specialty. In the Air Force, jobs are called AFSC – Air Force Specialty Code. In the Navy and Coast Guard, jobs are called ratings, or rate for short. Check the links below to see which jobs you will qualify for.
When preparing for the Arithmetic Reasoning section of the ASVAB test, always remember to scan the question first, identify all necessary parts, and discard the rest. Because word problems are lengthier than the actual equation or function, there will likely be a significant portion of text that is not relevant to solving the equation, but is used as filler to throw you off track. When dealing with these problems, identify all necessary information, formulate a workable equation, and solve the equation. As always, if you are uncertain about a specific question or section, feel free to move ahead to a section you are more comfortable with, and then circle around to the more difficult questions. While taking the test, exercise patience and reasoning to achieve a higher score.
We hope you find our study guides useful as you begin preparing to take the ASVAB! If you’re social like we are, please reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest. We’d love to answer your questions, get your feedback, or just hear more about your thoughts on the ASVAB or your intended branch of service. Good luck studying and congrats as you take this exciting first step towards your military career!

A wheel and axle can be thought of as a flexible lever that rotates around a center point that acts as the fulcrum. The arm lengths are represented by the radius of the wheel upon which the load force is applied and the radius upon which the load is applied. Depending upon which wheels the load and resistance forces are applied, the wheel and axle can multiply force or multiply speed.


To get started, take our free ASVAB practice exam on Study.com. This 15-question assessment evaluates your current understanding of the subjects that appear on the ASVAB, such as general science, mathematics, electronics and reading comprehension. Then, we'll immediately give you a diagnostic report of your performance that identifies where you need to focus and suggests a customized path of study. By recognizing the topics you need to study most, you can prepare for the ASVAB in a streamlined manner and focus on areas of the exam that will most impact your score.
Doing poorly on the ASVAB might mean missing out on the military job that you really want- and maybe not getting in the military at all. If you’re stressed about taking the ASVAB, don’t worry- we’ve got you covered! Our free study guides for the ASVAB will give you an overview of the concepts you need to know and will help you pinpoint the areas you should spend your time studying. From Arithmetic Reasoning to Word Knowledge and every subject in between, our study guides for the ASVAB will help you get the ASVAB score that you need!
Line scores, which are also known as composite scores, may be used to determine if an applicant would be a good fit for specific careers in a branch of the military. For example, an acceptable Skilled Technical (ST) score may be required for some positions in the Army. The ST score is determined by an individual's scores on the Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), General Science (GS), Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK) subtests of the ASVAB.
The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
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