The General Science subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery measures your knowledge of a variety of sciences, including: Earth science, biology, chemistry, health and more. The General Science subtest is NOT part of your Armed Forces Qualification Test score. However, it used to help determine qualification for a number of different military jobs. On this subtest, you will 25 questions to answer in 11 minutes on the paper version of the ASVAB and you will have 16 questions to answer in 8 minutes on the CAT-ASVAB.

Batteries can be connected in series to provide voltage equal to the sum of their individual voltages with a current equal to the current that a single battery produces.  Connect batteries in parallel to provide current equal to the sum of their individual currents with a voltage equal to the voltage that a single battery produces.  To increase both voltage and current, connect batteries in a series-parallel configuration.
Below you will find a helpful list of several official full length tests, sample questions, and guides to aid you in your studying for the ASVAB. It is important to remember while these resources may be helpful, they are not exhaustive in detail and will not cover everything found on the test. These guides should be used to familiarize yourself with the content and format of the questions. Click the links below to begin reviewing sample questions and taking your practice tests.

On the CAT-ASVAB, you answer one question at a time and can’t go back and change your answers once you’ve submitted them. If you answer a question correctly, you get a more difficult question, but if you are incorrect, you are given an easier question to answer. This is called “adaptive” testing. Once you finish a section you can go on to the next section at your own pace.
This subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is designed to gauge your understanding of simple machines and mechanisms. On the paper version of the ASVAB, you will have 19 minutes to answer 25 questions and on the CAT-ASVAB you will have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions. This subtest is NOT counted as part of your Armed Forces Qualification Test score. It is used to determine your qualification for certain military jobs. The Mechanical Comprehension subtest requires a good ability to decipher machine diagrams. You’ll also need a familiarity with mechanical physics and you will need good math skills as you may be required to explain mechanical principles by solving equations based on formulas.
The vast majority of ASVAB test takers will ultimately not enlist in the military. The ASVAB Career Exploration Program claims that only two-and-a-half percent of those who participate in the ASVAB join the military. Forty-seven percent of those who take the exam indicate an interest in attending a four-year college, and 16 percent of those who take the exam originally indicate some kind of an interest in joining the military.
For applicants with a high school diploma, the minimum required AFQT score to enlist in the Coast Guard is 40, while GED applicants must score a 50. GED recruits make up only 5 percent of each year's Coast Guard class. If an applicant's ASVAB subtest scores qualify for a specific job that is in demand, use of a waiver is possible if the applicant agrees to enlist for that job.
These are sections, or sub-tests, in the ASVAB:  Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), General Science (GS), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Electronics Information (EI), and Assembling Objects (AO), Auto & Shop Information (AS):  * AI and SI are administered as separate tests in the CAT-ASVAB (computerized version), but combined into one single score (labeled AS).
Army.mil says of ASVAB/PiCAT testing, “The ASVAB is usually given in schools by test administrators from the federal government. Schools determine where and when the ASVAB will be given. See your academic advisor for more information. If you’re not currently in school, contact your local recruiter.” Test administration and scheduling procedures are handled differently by each branch of the military.
The ASVAB test is taken by individuals interested in joining the U.S. military. It may be taken by high school students in the 10th, 11th or 12th grade. Or, it may be taken by someone who has earned a GED or higher degree. Along with determining your suitability for enlistment, the score you receive on this test lets officials know what military occupational specialties you may qualify for. 
According to the ASVAB testing site, the branches of the military use the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score to place soldiers into training groups. The AFQT score is comprised of four of the ASVAB subtests: the Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). The AFQT score is computed on a percentile score from 1 to 99; the higher the percentile score, the more likely a soldier is to get a military job he wants. In addition, branches of the military use individual subtest scores, such as Auto and Shop, to place soldiers for individual training.
Retesting is possible depending on a variety of circumstances. It is possible to retake the ASVAB or PiCAT, but you will need to coordinate this with your recruiting office. In general you may be required to wait a month or more to retake the test; each branch of the service may have different requirements that must be fulfilled in order to retest.
In addition to the ASVAB's AFQT, each branch has military occupational specialty, or MOS, scores. Combinations of scores from the nine tests are used to determine qualification for a MOS. These combinations are called "aptitude area scores", "composite scores", or "line scores". Each of the five armed services has its own aptitude area scores and sets its own minimum composite scores for each MOS.
The CAT-ASVAB is a multiple choice computer test consisting of ten subtests totaling 145 questions with an allotted time of 153 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours. The test will be adaptive meaning each question will be adapted to the skill level of the examinee based on their previous answers. The overwhelming majority of those, currently in the military, took the CAT-ASVAB. The table below provides a breakdown for the CAT-ASVAB:
The Auto and Shop Information subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery involves questions about automobile systems and functions/malfunctions and questions about common shop tools and fasteners and their uses. Your Auto and Shop Information subtest score is used to determine various job qualifications. It is not used in determining your Armed Forces Qualification Test score. On the ASVAB for the Auto and Shop Information subtest you will have 7 minutes to answer 11 auto-related questions and 6 minutes to answer 11 shop-related questions. On the paper version of the ASVAB, you will have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions, which are usually split between auto-related questions and shop-related questions.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB, scores are a part of what determines your ability to enlist in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. Your ASVAB score includes your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. For high school graduates, the required score is usually in the lower 30s, while those with a GED are usually required to score at least a 50. A "good" score for those who have graduated high school is considered to be a 35. However, each branch has its own minimum score necessary for enlistment, and the higher you score, the more jobs you will be qualified for in your branch of service.
Master the ASVAB is our 5th best overall prep book on our list of the best ASVAB prep books. One positive about this review guide is the diagnostic test. This diagnostic test is very good for helping you to figure out your weaknesses. When you know your weaknesses you can focus your preparation on those things that you can improve to get a higher score on the exam. This really allows you to save time studying since you don't need to practice the topics that you already have a good grasp of.
Here at ASVABTutor, we provide comprehensive study guides for each section of the ASVAB test that will help you prepare to ace the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery.  The ASVAB exam is a series of multiple-choice questions broken down into 9 subjects with an emphasis on determining your aptitude in four primary areas: Math, Verbal, Science and Technical, and Spatial. 

The CAT-ASVAB is a computer-based exam that is only provided at Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS) for enlistment purposes. The test is customized based on the taker’s answers, so if one question is answered correctly, the next one will be more difficult. This exam is timed, although users have the option of pacing themselves throughout the exam. However, it is not possible to go back through the test and check answers or change responses after they have been submitted. The CAT-ASVAB is broken down into 10 subparts, including basics such as arithmetic and verbal skills as well as auto information, electronics, shop, and mechanical knowledge.

First-class levers have the effort and the load on opposite sides of the fulcrum.  The mechanical advantage is (effort)(distance) = (load)(distance). If the distances are equal, then no mechanical advantage exists. If the effort arm is longer than the load arm then the lever will multiply the effort force and if the effort arm is shorter the lever will multiply the effort speed but not the effort force.
Again, would you rather go into the ASVAB unsure of what to expect and not knowing if you studied the right things or would you prefer to have taken similar tests covering content commonly tested for on the real thing? Taking practice tests is a great way to build your knowledge, your confidence and your ASVAB familiarity so that you feel relaxed and confident on test day.
Many students rush to an answer without fully understanding all of the question and each of the potential answers. A good approach is to read the entire question twice before you look at the answers. Also be sure to read each of the answer choices - test writers will often put misleading answers first to lure you in. Be careful, however, not to "over-think" the question! Most of the questions on the ASVAB are straight forward and don't require a "leap of faith" to answer.
For applicants with a high school diploma, the minimum required AFQT score to enlist in the Coast Guard is 40, while GED applicants must score a 50. GED recruits make up only 5 percent of each year's Coast Guard class. If an applicant's ASVAB subtest scores qualify for a specific job that is in demand, use of a waiver is possible if the applicant agrees to enlist for that job.

The ASVAB, or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, is a timed test given to those entering the military. There are several different areas you will be tested in, and Varsity Tutors’ ASVAB Learning Tools focus on the general science and math sections of the ASVAB. The experience is important, because your ultimate score is used to assess your qualifications for various military occupations and specialties once you are enrolled. To achieve a high score, you have to study hard and concentrate on the areas that give you the most trouble. Free ASVAB practice tests online give you the chance to brush up on concepts, work on your weaknesses, and become familiar with the test format while studying the material you’ll be tested on.
The P&P-ASVAB gives you a set number of questions to answer and a set time limit. If you finish a section before your time runs out, you may go back and review your answers and change them if you want to. It’s better to answer all of the questions on the P&P-ASVAB – there is no penalty for guessing because only correct answers are added to make up your final score.
Hey guys I’m currently enlisted us marine corps.. To anyone out there wondering the minimum score you need its a 32… Anyone with a GED cannot enlist in the usmc unless granted a waiver… To give you guys an idea on the jobs I took up infantry (0311) but I had a 84 on my asvab… With that score I was eligible for every MOS on the list.. From nuclear defense to military police.. I understand that’s a high score but I’m sure a 60 would get you just about anything also
Every concept explanation is immediately followed by the practice problems. This really helps you a lot in checking and backtracking your weak points since you can go back and forth between the questions and the subjects. You can practice and review at the same time, a great time saver. It also helps you to be able to go back into the chapter and look up where you were wrong. Make sure to reread the section if you are missing a lot of questions in certain sections. This makes it easy to see what your secret weaknesses are.
The ASVAB was created in 1968. By 1976, all branches of the military began using this test. In 2002, the test underwent many revisions, but its main goal of gauging a person’s basic skills remained the same. Today, there is a computerized version of the test as well as a written version. The Department of Defense developed this test and it’s taken by students in thousands of schools across the country. It is also given at Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS).
The Ultimate ASVAB Practice Pack provides you three full-length ASVAB practice tests with answer key and unlimited access to the ASVAB Online Practice Center. Modeled After the CAT-ASVAB with over 2000 questions in the question pool – each practice test is different every time you take it. See your AFQT score and Subtest scores at the end of each practice test. Track your scores and history online to monitor your progress and watch your scores increase! 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed.
If school district or open-enrollment charter school has entered into a prior contract under which a vocational aptitude test that does not comply with the requirements for an alternative test outlined above, then the school district, open-enrollment charter school, or high school may elect not to provide the ASVAB for the term of the contract. On the expiration of the contract term, the requirements outlined in this letter become applicable to the school district, open-enrollment charter school or high school.
There is another ASVAB score that's equally important, if not more so, because it is the score that determines if a person is eligible for military service. It's the Armed Forces Qualification Test score, or AFQT score. This score is calculated from only four of the nine Standard Scores on the ASVAB - Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). First, the WK and PC scores are added together, then the sum is doubled. This is known as the Verbal Expression (VE) score. The VE, MK, and AR scores are then added together, and the sum is the AFQT. This score is a straight percentile measure, expressed as a number from 1-99. The number is the percentage of people who scored lower than the test taker. For example, if a person receives an AFQT score of 63, that means that he did better on the test than 63% of the people who have taken it.
You’ll find a great practice test and lots of other information about the ASVAB at the Department of Defense's ASVAB Career Exploration Program site (ASVABprogram.com). Since your test scores can have an impact on your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS)—and whether or not you can attend certain special schools (like Airborne school, Sniper school and many others)—we recommend you make the most of these additional resources.
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