The ASVAB Career Exploration Program (CEP) , takes approximately three hours, covers eight subjects and is composed of 200 questions. The ASVAB CEP is currently a pen and paper test. If it is offered by their school, high school students can take the ASVAB CEP test in grades 10, 11 and 12. They can only take it at the high school they attend, unless special arrangements are made.
Like other military aptitude tests, the ASVAB measures general knowledge from a wide range of categories which can make studying for it seem hopeless at times. Fortunately there are a number of books and study guides out there to help you do well and increase your score. Although this list isn't comprehensive it does include the most helpful and relevant study guides available for succeeding on the ASVAB and, by extension, allowing you to start your career serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. 
Doing poorly on the ASVAB might mean missing out on the military job that you really want- and maybe not getting in the military at all. If you’re stressed about taking the ASVAB, don’t worry- we’ve got you covered! Our free study guides for the ASVAB will give you an overview of the concepts you need to know and will help you pinpoint the areas you should spend your time studying. From Arithmetic Reasoning to Word Knowledge and every subject in between, our study guides for the ASVAB will help you get the ASVAB score that you need!
The Marine Corps requires a minimum AFQT score of 32 for those with a high school diploma and a minimum score of 50 for applicants with a GED. As with the Navy, only 5 to 10 percent of each year's Marine Corps recruitment class has a GED. Like the Navy and Army, a minimum score of 50 is required to qualify for incentive programs, including enlistment bonuses, the Marine Corps College Fund and the Geographic Area of Choice Program.
The ASVAB is one of the most widely used aptitude tests in the world. The intent of the ASVAB test battery is to assess a candidate's potential for future success in the U.S. Military. Because of the nature of the test, the ASVAB can also be used to give a candidate valuable information about both military and civilian career choices that they may be suited for.
Doing poorly on the ASVAB might mean missing out on the military job that you really want- and maybe not getting in the military at all. If you’re stressed about taking the ASVAB, don’t worry- we’ve got you covered! Our free study guides for the ASVAB will give you an overview of the concepts you need to know and will help you pinpoint the areas you should spend your time studying. From Arithmetic Reasoning to Word Knowledge and every subject in between, our study guides for the ASVAB will help you get the ASVAB score that you need!

Though you may be intimidated by studying 5-7 nights a week, remember that this is only for a few months. The investment you make now in yourself can have great rewards - IF you put in the time! Just be honest with yourself, find out what you need to work on the most, and stick with your schedule! You may also want to set goals, such as "I want to take a practice test and score 80% or better on it within a month." However you choose to study, be consistent, be confident, and you will be successful!
The Assembling Objects section of the ASVAB practice test measures your ability to determine how an object will look when its parts are put together. You will be shown an illustration of pieces and asked to choose which one, among a selection of finished diagrams, shows how they fit together. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 16 minutes, while the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 15 minutes.
It sounds weird to take the test before the test without it being cheating, but that's what these practice questions allow you to do. These questions are similar to what you will see on the test so it feels like you are taking the test before you go in to take the real thing. That can help you in a number of ways. IT can help you feel like you know how you will do on the real test. It can help you study things you may have missed. It can give you confidence in what you have already studied. And it can point out errors you might have made on the test. Doing things a number of times can make you better so these practice questions can definitely make a difference.

Also, the answer explanations for all of these problems are very in-depth and detailed. Learning from your mistakes is one of the top ways to learn and this book really allows you to do that. Along with all the practice questions you get an all-inclusive and in-depth subject review on all of the topics included in the exam. Nothing is left out. Because of this, this is the only review book that you will need, no other supplement guides are needed (helping to save you money by only having to buy one guide!).
Unlike other vocabulary building books which just provide a lengthy list of words and definitions, Barron's organizes 800 words into sentence completion exercises of 10 words at a time which makes integrating these words into your everyday vocabulary much easier than just going down a list and relying on rote memorization. If you have an average vocabulary and and are looking to do well on the ASTB, Barron's Essential Words for the GRE is a great addition to your study material.

Arithmetic reasoning refers to the process of solving math word problems – you know those questions you had in elementary, middle and high school that might involve two trains traveling at different speeds or determining how many different pieces of fruit Tommy brought home from the grocery store. Whether you enjoy these types of problems or dread them, there is a process you can use to make solving them quicker and easier. Your test administrator will provide you with scratch paper and a number two pencil for this portion of the ASVAB. Calculators are not allowed. If you are taking the pencil-and-paper test, you will 36 minutes to answer 30 questions and if you are taking the computer version, you will have 39 minutes to answer 16 questions.


Again, we must stress that there is no passing or failing score on the exam. The test is a measure of aptitude and provides percentile rankings to indicate your performance compared to other test takers. However, different branches of the military do have minimum score requirements for enlistment. This means that it’s important to make sure you’re prepared for test day, and that’s where a practice test will prove valuable.
A conductor is a material through which electrical current can flow with little resistance.  An insulator is a material that resists electrical current and a semiconductor is a material that has conductivity partway between a conductor and an insulator with the primary advantage of showing increased conductivity with increased temperature unlike conductors where conductivity decreases with increased temperature.
The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.
A signalman handles visual communications between ships at sea. This job requires the same aptitudes as the yeoman above, but with an added dimension of Coding Speed (CS) from your ASVAB score. Or instead replace a yeoman’s Mathematics Knowledge with Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and you can be on your way to becoming a mess specialist who does the cooking for the fleet.
GED holders who earn 15 college credits 100 level or greater are considered equivalent with those holding high school diplomas, so that they need only the Tier I score to enlist. Eligibility is not determined by score alone. Certain recruiting goal practices may require an applicant to achieve a higher score than the required minimum AFQT score in order to be considered for enlistment. Rules and regulations are subject to change; applicants should call their local recruiting center for up to date qualification information.[4][5]
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