Your ASVAB scores determine what jobs you will qualify for in the military. But before you embarrass yourself in front of active duty service members, know that a job in the Army and the Marine Corps is called an MOS, which is an acronym for Military Occupational Specialty. In the Air Force, jobs are called AFSC – Air Force Specialty Code. In the Navy and Coast Guard, jobs are called ratings, or rate for short. Check the links below to see which jobs you will qualify for.

There are different minimum AFQT score requirements for enlisting in the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, although requirements will vary depending upon whether you have a high school diploma or a GED. Minimum score requirements change on a fairly regular basis, with higher scores being required during times of above-average enlistment levels. Enlistment bonuses, which are determined by your choice of military occupation, may also be influenced by AFQT scores.


AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
The ASVAB is a multiple choice test and is broken down into eight areas. Each section has its own score, and are combined to come up with your composite score. It’s scored on a percentile basis, so 99 is the highest possible score. Different branches of the military will have different minimum composite scores, and those will vary within each branch by different job. The higher you score, the more jobs and options you’ll qualify for. If you don’t take it in high school, you’ll take the test at your nearest Military Entrance Processing Station, or at an armory or recruiting station. It’s timed, and it takes about three and a half hours to complete.
The ASVAB Electronics Information subtest covers electricity principles and electronic devices, including radios, televisions, magnets, motors, transistors and much, much more. For this subtest, you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions when you take the CAT-ASVAB. You will 9 minutes to answer 20 questions on the pencil and paper version of the ASVAB test. The Electronics Information subtest covers a variety of electrical-related subjects including: You will need to know major electrical concepts, including how to use conductors, currents, circuits and insulators, among other things. You’ll also need to know various types of conductors and insulators and how effective they are. And that’s not all, you’ll also need to know different ways electricity can be used, the different types of electrical current and more.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB, scores are a part of what determines your ability to enlist in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. Your ASVAB score includes your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. For high school graduates, the required score is usually in the lower 30s, while those with a GED are usually required to score at least a 50. A "good" score for those who have graduated high school is considered to be a 35. However, each branch has its own minimum score necessary for enlistment, and the higher you score, the more jobs you will be qualified for in your branch of service.
Technical, Clerical, Combat, Electronics Repair, Field Artillery, General Maintenance, Mechanical Maintenance, Operators/Food, Surveillance/Communication Skilled Technician Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK). General Science (GS), Electronics Information (EI), Auto Information (AI), Shop Information (SI), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Assembling Objects (AO) Weighted combinations of all ASVAB Subtests
For almost a century, the U.S. military has been a pioneer in the field of using aptitude tests to evaluate an individual’s potential for service. The organization also uses the test to determine aptitude for various military occupational specialties (MOS). The use of aptitude tests began during World War I. While the group-administered Army Alpha test measured verbal and numerical ability as well as general knowledge, the Army Beta test was used to evaluate illiterate, unschooled and non-English speaking volunteers and draftees. The Army and Navy General Classifications Tests replaced the Alpha and Beta tests as a means to measure cognitive ability during World War II. The results of these tests, as well as additional classification exams, were used to assign recruits to a particular MOS.
Unlike enlisted applicants, officer candidates are judged solely on their General-Technical line score and not their AFQT score. Remember, the General-Technical score is comprised of the sum of Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, and the Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. The GT score requirement for prospective officers for each branch is detailed below. Note, the Air Force and the Navy do not use the ASVAB for officer applicants and rely on their own exams. 
Your performance in four basic areas – Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK) determines whether you’ve made the grade. Your scores in the AR, MK, and Verbal Composite (VE, which is WK+PC) sections add up to the all-important “AFQT” (Armed Forces Qualifying Test) score that recruiters use to see if you are eligible to serve.

It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.

Education Requirements – Like the Air Force, the Navy rarely accepts recruits without a high school diploma. GED enlistments must get at least a 50 on the AFQT and they can’t have drug or illegal activity on their police records. In addition, enlistments with only a GED must have three references from prominent members of the community (police, fire, teacher, civil servant, etc.). For those who have college experience, advanced enlistment ranking as high as E-3 is available for recruits with some college credits.
It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.
When you're finished with the course materials, take our complete ASVAB practice exams. These practice exams were crafted in the style of the actual ASVAB exam, so you can get comfortable with the exam's content, question format and difficulty level. The practice exams help reinforce your understanding of the material you've studied, and they'll identify incorrect answers, so you can go back to specific lessons and fill in any knowledge gaps if necessary. If you ever get stuck or need any extra help, reach out to our expert academic tutors. They'll be happy to help you out and answer any questions you may have.

The AFQT has been used in non-military settings as a proxy measure of intelligence, for example, in Herrnstein & Murray's book The Bell Curve. Because of the test's significance both inside and outside military settings, it is important to examine what the test measures, i.e. to evaluate the construct validity of the AFQT. Kaufman's 2010 review stated that David Marks (2010) scanned the literature for datasets containing test estimates for populations or groups taking both the AFQT and tests of literacy. One study on nine groups of soldiers differing in job and reading ability found a correlation of .96 between the AFQT and reading achievement (Sticht, Caylor, Kern, & Fox, 1972). Another study showed significant improvements among Black and Hispanic populations in their AFQT scores between 1980 and 1992 while Whites only showed a slight decrement (Kilburn, Hanser, & Klerman, 1998). Another study obtained reading scores for 17-year olds for those same ethnic groups and dates (Campbell et al., 2000) and found a correlation of .997 between reading scores and AFQT scores. This nearly perfect correlation was based on six pairs of data points from six independent population samples evaluated by two separate groups of investigators. According to Marks, "On the basis of the studies summarized here, there can be little doubt that the Armed Forces Qualifications Test is a measure of literacy." However, it is important to note that AFQT has been shown to correlate more highly with classic IQ tests than they do with one another, and that the "crystallized" intelligence measured by AFQT is measured very similarly by Wechsler, in particular.[8]
Again, we must stress that there is no passing or failing score on the exam. The test is a measure of aptitude and provides percentile rankings to indicate your performance compared to other test takers. However, different branches of the military do have minimum score requirements for enlistment. This means that it’s important to make sure you’re prepared for test day, and that’s where a practice test will prove valuable.
If you're looking for more information on the ASVAB, we've also written extensive articles about the test to help you feel confident on test day. Read through these informational ASVAB resources at any time to learn more about the purpose of the ASVAB, important concepts related to ASVAB qualification requirements, passing scores, registration process, test-taking strategies and much more.
The questions that have a tendency to arise rather quickly are something along the lines of “why is this test so important?” and “What is the overall purpose of this test?” Well, first it is important to define the actual test and to assess the colorful history of the test. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test (ASVAB) is a test that was officially formatted in 1968 with the intention of mentally preparing soldiers with knowledge that identifies with the following:
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