The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB test--also known as the AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test). This is the score used by the recruiter to determine a potential recruit’s enlistment eligibility, assign a recruit to a military jobs, and aid students in career exploration. The AFQT is actually a subset of the ASVAB - only with scores of four of the ten test sections calculated.
High school and postsecondary students can also take the ASVAB test as part of the Department of Defense’s Career Exploration Program. This paper-and-pencil version of the test is the same as the paper-and-pencil enlistment version but excludes the Assembling Objects section. It is intended to help those students considering a career in the military to discover their strengths in both military and civilian jobs. If the student scores high enough in the AFQT section of the test, he may use the score to enlist within the two-year expiration window.
If you’re planning on using your scores for military enlistment, you may be hoping to achieve a score that is high enough for a specific signing bonus. While it’s natural to want to do your best, putting extra pressure on yourself can cause unnecessary anxiety. Take a few deep breaths, relax, and remember that taking the test is only part of the entire recruitment process.
Barron's ASVAB is our 2nd overall prep book on our list of the best practice books. One strong point of Barron's is that the theory review and explanations are very detail-oriented and thorough. This thoroughness really helps you to absorb everything that you need to know for the exam. Learning from your mistakes is crucial, and this review guide really allows you to do just that.
Technical, Clerical, Combat, Electronics Repair, Field Artillery, General Maintenance, Mechanical Maintenance, Operators/Food, Surveillance/Communication Skilled Technician Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK). General Science (GS), Electronics Information (EI), Auto Information (AI), Shop Information (SI), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Assembling Objects (AO) Weighted combinations of all ASVAB Subtests
Do not underestimate the power of a positive attitude when taking the ASVAB. When preparing for the ASVAB and when actually taking the test, you need to be positive and have confidence. You need to believe that you will score high on the test. If you come across an answer that frustrates you - just relax, take a deep breath and attempt to answer it the best that you can. DO NOT PANIC! If you have prepared for the ASVAB with the resources at test-guide.com, then YOU WILL ACE YOUR ASVAB!
The inverse of an exponent is the root which is indicated by a radical sign √.  A root consists of a radicand which is the number for which you’re finding the root and an index indicating which root you’re finding.  For example, in 3√8 the number 8 is the radicand and the number 3 is the root.  (A radical sign with no specified index is assumed to have an index of 2.)
Jobs in the Marine Corps are referred to as”MOS” (short for Military Occupational Specialty). To find the MOSes you qualify for, the Marine Corps organizes your ASVAB subtest scores into various groups known as line scores. The ASVAB subtests are: General Science (GS); Arithmetic Reasoning (AR); Word Knowledge (WK); Paragraph Comprehension (PC); Numerical Operations (NO); Coding Speed (CS); Auto and Shop Information (AS); Mathematics Knowledge (MK); Mechanical Comprehension (MC); Electronics Information (EI); and Sum of Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension (VE). It’s important to remember that as Numerical Operations (NO) and Coding Speed (CS) subtests are phased out, some line scores may be updated.

The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
The Student ASVAB is the most flexible of the exams. It is typically provided to high school students to help them assess their skills, job prospects, potential military positions, or college majors. The ASVAB for students is essentially the same as the MET ASVAB exam, only students are not necessarily testing for positions within the military. The students’ school counselors examine their scores and help them decide on what to do after graduating from high school. This test is still an important component of a student’s education because it can help them identify their strengths and weaknesses and help set them on the right track for their future career goals.
Just as it sounds, in the Paragraph Comprehension subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery you will be reading paragraphs and then demonstrating your comprehension of those paragraphs by answering questions. This test is part of your Armed Forces Qualification Test score and is also used to determine qualification for a number of military jobs. In other words, this is a very important part of the ASVAB and you should strive to do as good as you can on it. On the paper-and-pencil version of the real ASVAB, you will need to answer 15 questions in 13 minutes when you come to this section. If you take the CAT-ASVAB, you will need to answer 11 questions in 22 minutes in this particular section.
A lot of people see the “CAT” term attached to the ASVAB test when they first start looking into the test and aren’t sure what that stands for. This term is an acronym and it stands for “Computerized Adaptive Test”. There are three different versions of the ASVAB test. The CAT is available at military processing stations for enlisting soldiers. The pencil and paper (also known as the P&P or S-ASVAB) version of the test is available for high school and college students who may not actually enlist. The third type of ASVAB test is the MET-ASVAB, or Mobile Examination Test, which is available only for enlisted soldiers at mobile testing centers (this test is also done with paper and pencil).

A star is a large gaseous body and planets and other material orbit stars and other massive objects with the shape of an orbit determined by the strength of the gravitational pull of the object that is being orbited.  A galaxy is a large cluster of stars held together by gravity where distance is measured in multiples of a light year which is the distance light travels in one year and is approximately 5.9 trillion miles.
The paper version of the ASVAB is similar to the CAT-ASVAB, but with a few notable differences. The difficulty of the tests are the same; however, the auto and shop information subtests are combined into one section, and the amount of questions and the time available for the subtests are different. On the paper version you will have 149 minutes, approximately 2.5 hours, to complete 225 questions. The table below provides a breakdown for the Paper & Pencil ASVAB:
Pay close attention to all numbers and figures mentioned within the body of the paragraph. Identify these numbers, set them aside, and identify which of the numbers are relevant and which of the numbers are tossed in for the purpose of throwing you off or misleading you. While paying attention to the numbers, also pay attention to the order. Identifying a 7 and a 9 as the two elements of a word problem is only effective if you are able to correctly identify the proper sequence of the numbers. 9-7 and 7-9 yield two very different results and may be the difference between passing and failing a test.
Scoring high on the ASVAB will require preparation and study. Don’t miss out on preparing for this important test — let us help prepare you for the ASVAB. Learn more about the ASVAB test, study with our test prep materials and take our practice test. Our website will give you an idea of how well you’ll score, identifies areas that you may need to work on and suggests resources and techniques that you can use. Additionally, check out the books that we recommend – these are the highest rated ASVAB preparation books available. Check out our ASVAB Study Guides. Interested in college? Check out our College Scholarships Guide, search over 20 million scholarships and grants.
Welcome to ASVAB Practice Tests, a free website that is designed to help you with your ASVAB test prep and review. Each of our free ASVAB practice tests includes challenging practice questions along with detailed explanations. Whether you are preparing for a career in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or the Marines you will need to pass the ASVAB test. If you study for this test it will make a big difference in your final score. Get started now with our free ASVAB practice tests!
These tests, again the high quality ones, are formatted like the real thing so you can get used to the question and answer formats and the time limits so nothing will be a surprise on test day. You’ll know what to expect and you’ll be used to going from different concept to different concept as is often required on the ASVAB. For example, on the math section you may have a problem using one popular math principle followed by another problem that relies on a completely different principle. This is common on a broad test like the ASVAB and preparing your mind to make these leaps can allow you to answer more questions in less time and boost your score.
To be admitted to the ASVAB testing room you will need to show a valid id. It is also important to be on time (or early!) since you will be turned away if you show up after the scheduled start time. The ASVAB can be given via computer or pencil and paper.  If you are testing at a MEPS site you will take it on a computer.  The pencil and paper version is given at most MET sites.  The computer version of the test is given as a "computer adaptive test" (CAT) which means that the test will adapt based on the level of the individual test taker (e.g., if you answer many questions correctly, you may be shown fewer questions).

PiCAT testing does require a shorter “verification test” for new recruits. This is in the form of a short, proctored test that lasts about a half an hour. Depending on circumstances, recruits may be required to take this verification test at a Military Entrance Processing Station, or within 30 days of taking PiCAT if the recruit is not going to MEPS right away. Those who do not pass the verification test will be required to take the ASVAB.


Senate Bill (SB) 1843 (85th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 2017) authorizes that each school year, each school district and open-enrollment charter school is required to provide students in grades 10 through 12 an opportunity to take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test and consult with a military recruiter. School districts and open-enrollment charter schools must:
When you're finished with the course materials, take our complete ASVAB practice exams. These practice exams were crafted in the style of the actual ASVAB exam, so you can get comfortable with the exam's content, question format and difficulty level. The practice exams help reinforce your understanding of the material you've studied, and they'll identify incorrect answers, so you can go back to specific lessons and fill in any knowledge gaps if necessary. If you ever get stuck or need any extra help, reach out to our expert academic tutors. They'll be happy to help you out and answer any questions you may have.
There are essentially two options when it comes to preparing for this test. First, a person can attempt to reassess all of the information that they learned over a decade by spending hours compiling information. Secondly, a person can find a specially formatted ASVAB practice test that covers all areas of both the written test and computerized test. Clearly, the best choice is the ASVAB practice test. The question becomes “Where does one find an accurate ASVAB practice test?”
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