After a candidate has completed the ASVAB they must wait one calendar month before retaking the exam. An additional calendar month must pass before retesting a second time. Six calendar months must pass before retaking the test a third time. The scores received from the ASVAB may be used for enlistment for up to two years from the initial test date. 

The following is the formula for computing your AFQT score: 2VE + MK + AR. Verbal Expression (VE) is the sum of Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK). Unfortunately it is not possible to compute your AFQT score since the formula requires your subtests' raw scores which the military does not provide on your score sheet; they only report the subtests' standard scores.
The sections are as follows, General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and a Verbal Expression score influenced by the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension sections of the test. Those looking to join the Navy also complete a Coding Speed test.

Line Scores are composed of the sum of particular combinations of ASVAB subtests. These scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Line Scores are not used to determine eligibility for particular military occupations for officer candidates. Job availability for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS).

The following is the formula for computing your AFQT score: 2VE + MK + AR. Verbal Expression (VE) is the sum of Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK). Unfortunately it is not possible to compute your AFQT score since the formula requires your subtests' raw scores which the military does not provide on your score sheet; they only report the subtests' standard scores.
In complete honesty, one can say that the test identifies with an entire life's worth of knowledge. It essentially pulls from 3 different aspects. First, it draws from concrete facts that were acquired from all areas of a person's educational career. Secondly, it draws from a person’s ability to comprehend and use context clues to make assumptions. Lastly, it draws from a person’s physical/verbal skills to see if they can properly administer those more physical aspects. Overall this is why people have identified it as the “SAT on steroids.”
×