The ASVAB is one of the most widely used aptitude tests in the world. The intent of the ASVAB test battery is to assess a candidate's potential for future success in the U.S. Military. Because of the nature of the test, the ASVAB can also be used to give a candidate valuable information about both military and civilian career choices that they may be suited for.
This is the most recent and updated publication of the infamous, ASVAB FOR DUMMIES. Although slightly more expensive than the original version, the ASVAB FOR DUMMIES PREMIER PLUS comes with the standard three full length practice tests and one year of online access to an additional six practice tests. You will also have access to 300 ASVAB flash cards, and the ability to create your own practice tests to hone in on your weaknesses and rise above them.
Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools free ASVAB study material is a great opportunity for you to tune up your skills before you take the test. You might discover that you simply have to brush up on some science, math, or definitions to get ready to take the test. The simple ASVAB review tests enable you become more confident as well. There’s no better way to succeed in reaching your goals than by being prepared ahead of time.

The ASVAB test is administered to potential military recruits to help determine which branch of service and which military jobs they will be best suited for. It is not a test of intelligence and is administered only in English. The test consists of nine subjects: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, and Assembling Objects.


The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
It had sections on the mechanical portion of the ASVAB that were very helpful as well as Mathematical practices that served as a great refresher for me. The strategies were also very helpful and gave me confidence going into the test. After going through the book and taking the practice exams, I feel I was well prepared for the ASVAB test. My score almost doubled from my previous attempt at the test after using this guide.
Varsity Tutors’ ASVAB Learning Tools can also help you work in groups, if you so choose. They let you post results on social media so others can see how you did. Many people actually share their progress over time and make this an opportunity to help one another; they’ll even compete in practice tests to make them more fun. The ASVAB practice tests provide a sample of the material you’ll be asked to work with on test day. They are structured in a precise, non-intimidating format with honest and detailed feedback. The study process is made simpler and more efficient while also facilitating a more personalized process of studying.
Using the right ASVAB study guide is an important factor in determining how well you will do on the exam. Each branch of the U.S. Military requires you take an ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) exam.  Your scores on the ASVAB determine not only your entrance into the military, but also your job, advancement opportunities, and potential salary.  The ASVAB exam consists of questions in ten different areas, but in general, the exam is measuring your aptitude in four key areas: Math, Verbal, Science and Technical, and Spatial.  To efficiently prepare for your ASVAB exam, check out our recommended study guides, our free practice exams, our ASVAB flash cards, and our ASVAB study tips.
General Science tests the ability to answer questions on a variety of science topics drawn from courses taught in most high schools. The life science items cover botany, zoology, anatomy and physiology, and ecology. The earth and space science items are based on astronomy, geology, meteorology and oceanography. The physical science items measure force and motion mechanics, energy, fluids, atomic structure and chemistry.
The Arithmetic Reasoning section of the ASVAB test focuses on word problems and delivers mathematical questions and equations in a format that must be synthesized. These may not only be simple questions involving basic multiplication, but may also be as complex as completing a physics equation listed in paragraph or word-block format. When deconstructing these word problems, pay close attention to all aspects of the question, including all numbers mentioned, buzzwords, and the format of the paragraph itself. The following pointers will give you a more in-depth analysis of each component of word problems.

Don’t let the PC section of the test throw you for a loop. Unlike the individual multiple choice questions in other sections, here you will need to read a paragraph and answer several questions in a row based on that one paragraph. The people who designed this section of the exam really knew how to make sure you are able to read detailed (and often boring) documents, remember the details of what you read, understand why they’re important, and be able to pick out the key concepts they illustrate. When you read each paragraph, it’s helpful to know the kinds of questions you’ll be asked at the end. There are basically four kinds of questions to test your comprehension:
These are sections, or sub-tests, in the ASVAB:  Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), General Science (GS), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Electronics Information (EI), and Assembling Objects (AO), Auto & Shop Information (AS):  * AI and SI are administered as separate tests in the CAT-ASVAB (computerized version), but combined into one single score (labeled AS).
Air Force recruits must score at least 36 points the 99-point ASVAB. The overall ASVAB score is known as the AFQT score, or Armed Forces Qualification Test score. Exceptions may be made, however, for a handful of high school graduates who can score as low as 31. The vast majority, some 70 percent, of those accepted for an Air Force enlistment achieve a score of 50 or above.
The Kaplan ASVAB Premier 2017-2018 Practice Tests are the top of the line study prep materials for potential test takers. How do you know? Try the “Higher Score Guarantee” it comes with. Not many testing materials offer up that level of confidence in their product. With over 1,850 questions, you’d be hard pressed to find something more comprehensive than this collection of online, print, video and mobile test practice goodies.

One flaw of this review guide is that the summary is not as comprehensive as other prep guides. At only 324 Pages, this prep book does not have enough length to meticulously go through all of the topics. If you are looking for an in-depth rundown you may need to supplement this prep book with another review guide. If you just need a quick overview, however, this guide may be perfect for you.
Batteries can be connected in series to provide voltage equal to the sum of their individual voltages with a current equal to the current that a single battery produces.  Connect batteries in parallel to provide current equal to the sum of their individual currents with a voltage equal to the voltage that a single battery produces.  To increase both voltage and current, connect batteries in a series-parallel configuration.
Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]
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