Education Requirements – Recruits without a high school diploma are practically ineligible to enlist. The Marine Corps do not allow more than 5% of recruits to enlist without a high school diploma, and those recruits must have a GED. Those with only a GED must score at least a 50 on the AFQT to be considered. As with the other branches, the Marine Corps provides advanced enlistment rank for recruits that have some college experience (i.e. credits). However, the Marines are less generous to recruits with some college credit as they only allow the maximum advanced rank of E-2 upon enlistment.
AFQT (Armed Force Qualification Test) score: This score is reported in the form of a percentile rank and is calculated by adding the scores that you have received for the 4 sub-tests, viz, Mathematics Knowledge, Arithmetic Reasoning, Paragraph Comprehension and Word Knowledge. The total score that you receive for these sub-tests is then compared to the scores that other candidates taking a similar format of the test have received. Then you receive a percentile rank that can range anywhere from 1 to 99. For example, if you receive a rank of 45 percentile then you have scored more than 45 students, but 55 students have scored more than you.
The way to prepare for this exam is study hard and then quiz yourself with plenty of practice ASVAB tests. Remember that the exam is identical for all branches, so an Army ASVAB practice test is exactly the same as an ASVAB practice test for the Navy. The most important components of the test are the ones that count towards the Armed Services Qualifications Test, or AFQT. These sections are Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Math Knowledge. For tips and strategies for success on these questions, be sure to review our article on ASVAB Test Prep.
The Arithmetic Reasoning section of the test measures your ability to solve arithmetic word problems. You may be asked questions such as “If the tire of a car rotates at a constant speed of 552 times in 1 minute, how many times will the tire rotate in half an hour?” Therefore, reviewing common math key words associated with each operation is recommended. For example, if you see the key words “in all,” the problem deals with addition. If the problem asks you to “find the difference,” you are being asked to subtract. If a question asks “how many times” per day or week, you know you are dealing with multiplication. If it asks “how many in each,” you should be thinking about division. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 39 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 30 questions in 36 minutes.
Retesting is possible depending on a variety of circumstances. It is possible to retake the ASVAB or PiCAT, but you will need to coordinate this with your recruiting office. In general you may be required to wait a month or more to retake the test; each branch of the service may have different requirements that must be fulfilled in order to retest.
All test takers are given a summary results sheet that shows their percentile score in every test area. A percentile score of 50 means that a score was achieved that was better than 50 percent of all test takers. Percentile scores are given specifically for test takers of their gender and their grade level. Information obtained from the test is only shared with agencies within the Department of Defense. Test takers are informed that their specific scores will be used for up to two years for recruiting purposes. After two years, test scores will be used for research purposes only.

8. Use the following passage to answer questions 8 and 9. Harry went to the drugstore and purchased band-aids, pain relievers and cold medication. He also picked up two prescriptions. He then stopped by the hardware store and bought nails, screws and a first aid kit. Finally, he went to the grocery store and bought orange juice, flour and eggs. Where did Harry buy the first aid kit?
The exam is not a “pass or fail” test. Your score in each area reflects your own unique abilities. Of course, you will want to study with the aim of doing your best so that you can qualify for a job that fits your skills and career interests. Your AFQT score is compared to the scores of other recruits in the 18-23 year age bracket to see how your potential measures up.
My son wants to serve in the military. He graduates this May from HS. He’s taken a practice ASVAB at school along with others wanting to join. He’s very bright and is a B student at at his school and knows the class material. However, he didn’t test well on the ASFAB pretest at school with only a 16. His concern is that he won’t get in the military and is worried he won’t be able to serve in some military capacity. Any ideas on how we can help him? Thanks!
The adaptive test is exactly what it sounds like, a test that adapts to the test taker. Questions in each section range in difficulty, and based on the test taker’s answers, the question types and difficulties adjust with each answer. This type of test allows for a greater level of accuracy in evaluating a prospect’s abilities. For the most part, correct answers beget more difficult questions while wrong answers will reduce the difficulty of proceeding questions.

The ASVAB contains 10 subtests, which are grouped under different qualification areas. The AFQT portion of the test includes Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, and Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. A minimum score of 32 on this portion is required to enlist in the Marine Corp for recruits with a high school diploma, and those with a GED must score 50.
Hey guys I’m currently enlisted us marine corps.. To anyone out there wondering the minimum score you need its a 32… Anyone with a GED cannot enlist in the usmc unless granted a waiver… To give you guys an idea on the jobs I took up infantry (0311) but I had a 84 on my asvab… With that score I was eligible for every MOS on the list.. From nuclear defense to military police.. I understand that’s a high score but I’m sure a 60 would get you just about anything also
Bar none this is the best study guide available for those who aren't particularly adept at math or haven't taken a math class in a long time. CliffNotes Math Review for Standardized Tests covers everything from arithmetic and algebra to geometry and word problems. This book manages to break down increasingly complicated math problems in such a way that is very easy to understand. 
This study guide for the ASVAB is by far the BEST. It’s very informative. It has strategies and techniques to attack the exam that will make you feel more confident. I’m very glad to have this book. Awesome Investment!! This book is by far the BEST guide to have. Its very informative and it has different techniques to tackle the ASVAB. It even includes a BONUS website that is also very helpful.
Arithmetic reasoning refers to the process of solving math word problems – you know those questions you had in elementary, middle and high school that might involve two trains traveling at different speeds or determining how many different pieces of fruit Tommy brought home from the grocery store. Whether you enjoy these types of problems or dread them, there is a process you can use to make solving them quicker and easier. Your test administrator will provide you with scratch paper and a number two pencil for this portion of the ASVAB. Calculators are not allowed. If you are taking the pencil-and-paper test, you will 36 minutes to answer 30 questions and if you are taking the computer version, you will have 39 minutes to answer 16 questions.

An inductor stores energy in the form of a magnetic field and inductance is the property of a component that opposes the change in current of an AC circuit.  An inductor is often formed by wrapping a wire coil around a magnetic core and the level of inductance is directly proportional to the number of turns in the coil, its radius, and the type of material in the core.
CliffNotes has a pre-test and post-test for every section in the book including numerous practice problems for each type of math question. By the time you finish this book, you will have covered hundreds of math problems including some of the most common problems found on standardized tests. Although this book was not written exclusively for the ASTB many of the questions found

Depends. Only the US Army, Marine Corps, and the US Coast Guard accept the ASVAB for officer applicants. Prospective officer candidates looking at the Air Force and the Navy do not have to take the ASVAB. Instead prospective USAF and USN officer candidates will take the AFOQT and the ASTB-E. If you are interested in joining the US Coast Guard as an officer, you also have the option of taking the Navy's officer candidate test, the ASTB-E, in lieu of the ASVAB.
The way to prepare for this exam is study hard and then quiz yourself with plenty of practice ASVAB tests. Remember that the exam is identical for all branches, so an Army ASVAB practice test is exactly the same as an ASVAB practice test for the Navy. The most important components of the test are the ones that count towards the Armed Services Qualifications Test, or AFQT. These sections are Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Math Knowledge. For tips and strategies for success on these questions, be sure to review our article on ASVAB Test Prep.

Doing poorly on the ASVAB might mean missing out on the military job that you really want- and maybe not getting in the military at all. If you’re stressed about taking the ASVAB, don’t worry- we’ve got you covered! Our free study guides for the ASVAB will give you an overview of the concepts you need to know and will help you pinpoint the areas you should spend your time studying. From Arithmetic Reasoning to Word Knowledge and every subject in between, our study guides for the ASVAB will help you get the ASVAB score that you need!
My son wants to serve in the military. He graduates this May from HS. He’s taken a practice ASVAB at school along with others wanting to join. He’s very bright and is a B student at at his school and knows the class material. However, he didn’t test well on the ASFAB pretest at school with only a 16. His concern is that he won’t get in the military and is worried he won’t be able to serve in some military capacity. Any ideas on how we can help him? Thanks!
In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
It sounds weird to take the test before the test without it being cheating, but that's what these practice questions allow you to do. These questions are similar to what you will see on the test so it feels like you are taking the test before you go in to take the real thing. That can help you in a number of ways. IT can help you feel like you know how you will do on the real test. It can help you study things you may have missed. It can give you confidence in what you have already studied. And it can point out errors you might have made on the test. Doing things a number of times can make you better so these practice questions can definitely make a difference.
A signalman handles visual communications between ships at sea. This job requires the same aptitudes as the yeoman above, but with an added dimension of Coding Speed (CS) from your ASVAB score. Or instead replace a yeoman’s Mathematics Knowledge with Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and you can be on your way to becoming a mess specialist who does the cooking for the fleet.

While you may want to get the ASVAB over with, it is important to give yourself enough time to prepare and practice for the ASVAB. Once you take the test you will have to wait 30 days before you are eligible to re-take the test if you got a non-passing score, or if you want a better grade. After you retake the test twice, you will need to wait for a 6 month time period before being able to take the test again. For this reason, it is important to pick an ASVAB test date that gives you plenty of time to practice and prepare for each section of the test.
Focus on the four essential sections, those critical to the AFQT score, first. From the example above, it seems that your verbal abilities are at least OK: you gave yourself a 4 on the Word Knowledge section and a 3 on the Paragraph Comprehension. However, your math skills could use some work – especially with Mathematics Knowledge, as you only have a skill level of 2. This you that you'll have to work extra hard on the math sections.
The food chain describes the interdependency of the various organisms within a community.  The food chain is made up of producers that make their own food and consumers that cannot produce their own food and feed on producers.  Primary consumers feed directly on producers, secondary consumers feed on primary consumers and producers, and tertiary consumers feed on all organisms lower in the food chain.  Also in the food chain are decomposers like bacteria and fungi which break down all members of the food chain to recycle their organic compounds.
The ASVAB is routinely reviewed to eliminate any potential biases from questions and scoring. The exam underwent a major revision in 2002. Two years later, a renormalization of the percentile scoring system was performed to ensure that a 50 percent score represented performing better than 50 percent of all test takers. The 10-section ASVAB improves the matching of volunteers with available jobs and helps match job openings with qualified individuals.
Mathematics Knowledge tests the ability to solve problems by applying knowledge of mathematical concepts and applications. The problems focus on concepts and algorithms, and involve number theory, numeration, algebraic operations and equations, geometry, measurement and probability. Mathematics Knowledge is one factor that characterizes mathematics comprehension; it also assesses logical thinking.
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