All test takers are given a summary results sheet that shows their percentile score in every test area. A percentile score of 50 means that a score was achieved that was better than 50 percent of all test takers. Percentile scores are given specifically for test takers of their gender and their grade level. Information obtained from the test is only shared with agencies within the Department of Defense. Test takers are informed that their specific scores will be used for up to two years for recruiting purposes. After two years, test scores will be used for research purposes only.
In addition, your scores on the other ASVAB composite tests will determine your career field or military occupation eligibility. Since enlistment bonuses are usually tied to your choice of occupations, the better the score, the more opportunities you have. But keep in mind, it is impossible to literally "ace" the ASVAB, so your goal should be to simply do your best.

According to the ASVAB testing site, there are between eight and nine subtests, depending on which version of the ASVAB a soldier takes. On some of the ASVAB tests, the Auto and Shop subtests are combined. The subtests and their abbreviations are General Science (GS), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), Auto Information (AI), Shop Information (SI), Mechanical Comprehension (MC). Each section has between 15 and 35 questions.
The format is different depending on where you take the test. At MEP sites, the test is computer-based and is given in an adaptive format. This means that questions may get easier or harder based on your answers to previous questions. The ASVAB-CT does not allow you to review or change your answers, which some recruits may find difficult, but it has some advantages over the pencil-and-paper version given at satellite MET locations. Overall, the exam takes only about 1 ½ hours to complete, doing each section at your own pace – and you can see your scores as soon as you finish taking the test. The pencil-and-paper version takes longer (3-4 hours total time), is not adaptive, and has a time limit for each subtest. You are allowed to change your answers for each subtest before moving on to the next one, but only before the time limit is reached for that subtest. In addition, scores must be processed manually and so they are not available for a few days – although a preliminary AFQT score will be calculated and given to your recruiter once you have completed the test.
It sounds weird to take the test before the test without it being cheating, but that's what these practice questions allow you to do. These questions are similar to what you will see on the test so it feels like you are taking the test before you go in to take the real thing. That can help you in a number of ways. IT can help you feel like you know how you will do on the real test. It can help you study things you may have missed. It can give you confidence in what you have already studied. And it can point out errors you might have made on the test. Doing things a number of times can make you better so these practice questions can definitely make a difference.
Additionally, many ASVAB practice tests have a section explaining the answer choices. It can be tempting to read the explanation and think that you now have a good understanding of the concept. However, an explanation likely only covers part of the question’s broader context. Even if the explanation makes sense, go back and investigate every concept related to the question until you’re positive you have a thorough understanding.

Don’t be fooled by the appearance of the low numbers, the algorithm that computes the AFQT is very sophisticated. Just because your ASVAB score is 40 doesn’t mean that you only got 40% of the questions correct, it could simply mean that you lack strength in one area, but succeed with high praise in another. Your ASVAB score is only a means by which you are categorized for available positions; it is by no means a measure of intelligence.
In addition, your scores on the other ASVAB composite tests will determine your career field or military occupation eligibility. Since enlistment bonuses are usually tied to your choice of occupations, the better the score, the more opportunities you have. But keep in mind, it is impossible to literally "ace" the ASVAB, so your goal should be to simply do your best.
Do not underestimate the power of a positive attitude when taking the ASVAB. When preparing for the ASVAB and when actually taking the test, you need to be positive and have confidence. You need to believe that you will score high on the test. If you come across an answer that frustrates you - just relax, take a deep breath and attempt to answer it the best that you can. DO NOT PANIC! If you have prepared for the ASVAB with the resources at test-guide.com, then YOU WILL ACE YOUR ASVAB!
A whopping 91% of the reviewers of this ASVAB study guide on Amazon gave it five stars. The other 9%? Four stars. If you can’t trust Amazon reviewers, who can you trust? The beauty of this simply titled study guide is in the depth of explanations in how the answers are derived, particularly in the mathematics sections where the authors go to great lengths to illustrate the more complex questions.

How good is your vocabulary? It’s never too late to brush up by using “vocabulary builders” you find on Google, reading a variety of books, manuals and magazines, and using practice tests to identify words that you’re not sure of. The WK section tests your word knowledge in several ways. First, it tests whether you can recognize correct and incorrect spellings of words. For this type of question, you may want to review words that are often spelled incorrectly, and make sure you know how to spell them. You will also need to know the definitions of words, and be able to use them in a sentence. The more you practice, the better you will be at automatically recognizing the right spelling of a word, and the easier it will be to know it’s precise meaning when it’s used in a sentence.
My recruiter told me about this book so I ordered it and got it 3 days later from the Military Bookstore. I got this book and it is awesome. The cd works great and every thing I needed and more to help me was in there. I recommend this book to everyone who is thinking of going in the service and wants to get a real job! GET THIS BOOK AND SCORE HIGH!!!!”
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB, scores are a part of what determines your ability to enlist in the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. Your ASVAB score includes your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. For high school graduates, the required score is usually in the lower 30s, while those with a GED are usually required to score at least a 50. A "good" score for those who have graduated high school is considered to be a 35. However, each branch has its own minimum score necessary for enlistment, and the higher you score, the more jobs you will be qualified for in your branch of service.
Below you will find a helpful list of several official full length tests, sample questions, and guides to aid you in your studying for the ASVAB. It is important to remember while these resources may be helpful, they are not exhaustive in detail and will not cover everything found on the test. These guides should be used to familiarize yourself with the content and format of the questions. Click the links below to begin reviewing sample questions and taking your practice tests.

McGraw-Hill’s ASVAB, 3rd Edition: Strategies + 4 Practice Tests. A final option is this ASVAB study guide from McGraw-Hill. The author of this book used to work for the Department of Defense in their ASVAB career program, so she definitely has the inside track on test prep. Includes comprehensive topic reviews, four complete practice tests, and test-taking strategies. And remember, you will take the same test whether you are planning to join the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard.
In order to take the ASVAB at a MEPS for enlistment purposes, an individual will need to speak with a recruiter and schedule a time to take the test. ASVAB testing at a MEPS is self-paced and taken on a computer, and it may be retaken after a one-month waiting period.  Entitled the CAT-ASVAB, the test is adaptive – meaning it adapts to your ability level.
Improper Fraction: With an improper fraction, the numerator is bigger than the denominator. To convert a mixed fraction to an improper fraction multiply the denominator by the whole integer part, then add this to the numerator. This is the new numerator of the converted improper fraction. The original denominator is retained. For example, with , multiply 5 by 1, and add this product to 3 to get:
In addition to the ASVAB's AFQT, each branch has military occupational specialty, or MOS, scores. Combinations of scores from the nine tests are used to determine qualification for a MOS. These combinations are called "aptitude area scores", "composite scores", or "line scores". Each of the five armed services has its own aptitude area scores and sets its own minimum composite scores for each MOS.
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