The ASVAB Career Exploration Program (CEP) , takes approximately three hours, covers eight subjects and is composed of 200 questions. The ASVAB CEP is currently a pen and paper test. If it is offered by their school, high school students can take the ASVAB CEP test in grades 10, 11 and 12. They can only take it at the high school they attend, unless special arrangements are made.
Bar none this is the best study guide available for those who aren't particularly adept at math or haven't taken a math class in a long time. CliffNotes Math Review for Standardized Tests covers everything from arithmetic and algebra to geometry and word problems. This book manages to break down increasingly complicated math problems in such a way that is very easy to understand. 
In order to take the ASVAB at a MEPS for enlistment purposes, an individual will need to speak with a recruiter and schedule a time to take the test. ASVAB testing at a MEPS is self-paced and taken on a computer, and it may be retaken after a one-month waiting period.  Entitled the CAT-ASVAB, the test is adaptive – meaning it adapts to your ability level.
ASVAB Score – The Coast Guard is the most difficult branch of the military to enter with a minimum ASVAB score of 45 required to enlist. A waiver is possible if a recruit’s scores on subtests outside of the AFQT, such as Mechanical Comprehension, make the recruit eligible for a specific job and the recruit is willing to agree to enter that job upon enlistment.
It had sections on the mechanical portion of the ASVAB that were very helpful as well as Mathematical practices that served as a great refresher for me. The strategies were also very helpful and gave me confidence going into the test. After going through the book and taking the practice exams, I feel I was well prepared for the ASVAB test. My score almost doubled from my previous attempt at the test after using this guide.
Commander-in-chief: President of the United States Secretary of Defense Deputy Secretary of Defense Secretary of Homeland Security Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Joint Chiefs of Staff: Chairman Vice Chairman United States Congress: Committees on Armed Services: Senate House Active duty four-star officers United States military seniority National Security Act of 1947 Goldwater–Nichols Act

The inverse of an exponent is the root which is indicated by a radical sign √.  A root consists of a radicand which is the number for which you’re finding the root and an index indicating which root you’re finding.  For example, in 3√8 the number 8 is the radicand and the number 3 is the root.  (A radical sign with no specified index is assumed to have an index of 2.)


One flaw of this review guide is that the summary is not as comprehensive as other prep guides. At only 324 Pages, this prep book does not have enough length to meticulously go through all of the topics. If you are looking for an in-depth rundown you may need to supplement this prep book with another review guide. If you just need a quick overview, however, this guide may be perfect for you.
The multiples of a number are the set of numbers formed by multiplying a number by other numbers.  For example, the first five multiples of 3 are {3, 6, 9, 12, 15}.  The least common multiple of two numbers is the smallest number that both numbers factor into evenly.  The first five multiples of of 4 are {4, 8, 12, 16, 20} making the least common multiple of 3 and 4 equal to 12.
Barron's ASVAB is our 2nd overall prep book on our list of the best practice books. One strong point of Barron's is that the theory review and explanations are very detail-oriented and thorough. This thoroughness really helps you to absorb everything that you need to know for the exam. Learning from your mistakes is crucial, and this review guide really allows you to do just that.

You are tested in four critical areas — Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension and Mathematics Knowledge (see below) — these scores count towards your Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) score. The AFQT score determines whether you’re qualified to enlist in the U.S. military. Your scores in the other areas of the ASVAB determine how qualified you are for certain military specialties. Score high, and your chances of getting the specialty/job you want increase. The better score you get, the better chance you have of pursuing the specialty or field that you desire.
First-class levers have the effort and the load on opposite sides of the fulcrum.  The mechanical advantage is (effort)(distance) = (load)(distance). If the distances are equal, then no mechanical advantage exists. If the effort arm is longer than the load arm then the lever will multiply the effort force and if the effort arm is shorter the lever will multiply the effort speed but not the effort force.

The AFQT composite score is used by all military branches to determine basic acceptance; however, there are other composite scores that are calculated by using unique formulas that group the subtests in order to determine the aptitude for a particular type of work. For instance, to work in Electronics Repair within the Marine Corp, the EL score, or Electronics Repair composite score, would be calculated. This score consists of the subtests for Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, and General Science. To become an Unmanned Aerial System Avionics Technician, the individual must have an EL score of 105, while it would take 115 to become an Aviation Logistics Information Management and Support Specialist.
I have not read up too much on how scoring works, but I just finished A practice ASVAB test, and scored 136 of 225, was just wondering what rank that would put me at in the army?, I have been thinking long about the idea of joining, the only thing that holds me back from making the descision to join is my lack of education, (dropped out) but plan to get my GED as soon as possible. PS. I’m only 17yrs young. But my parents and I have agreed that they would consent.
To get started, take our free ASVAB practice exam on Study.com. This 15-question assessment evaluates your current understanding of the subjects that appear on the ASVAB, such as general science, mathematics, electronics and reading comprehension. Then, we'll immediately give you a diagnostic report of your performance that identifies where you need to focus and suggests a customized path of study. By recognizing the topics you need to study most, you can prepare for the ASVAB in a streamlined manner and focus on areas of the exam that will most impact your score.
Depends. Only the US Army, Marine Corps, and the US Coast Guard accept the ASVAB for officer applicants. Prospective officer candidates looking at the Air Force and the Navy do not have to take the ASVAB. Instead prospective USAF and USN officer candidates will take the AFOQT and the ASTB-E. If you are interested in joining the US Coast Guard as an officer, you also have the option of taking the Navy's officer candidate test, the ASTB-E, in lieu of the ASVAB.
Barron's ASVAB is our 2nd overall prep book on our list of the best practice books. One strong point of Barron's is that the theory review and explanations are very detail-oriented and thorough. This thoroughness really helps you to absorb everything that you need to know for the exam. Learning from your mistakes is crucial, and this review guide really allows you to do just that.

The verbal expression (VE) part of the ASVAB is really important. It factors in to not only your AFQT score, but your Line Score. Line Scores are what determine your job qualifications. Your VE score is computed using adding your Word Knowledge (WK) raw score to the Paragraph Comprehension (PC) raw score. It is then converted to a scaled score ranging from 20 to 62.


It's important to understand the difference between the ASVAB Standard Scores, and the ASVAB AFQT score. Test takers will receive a separate score for each of the nine sections on the ASVAB. These scores are known as Standard Scores. A Standard Score is used to determine how the test taker compares to the "average" 18-23 year old American on that part of the ASVAB. Not long ago, a large number of people in this age group were given the tests, and these results are the benchmark for Standard Scores. Around half the people in this age group will score a 50 or higher, and about 16% will score a 60 or higher. In other words, the scoring is based on a standard bell curve distribution. Standard Scores are very important when it comes to determining which military job a person will be assigned to.
The majority of people who complete the exam have little intention of entering the military. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the United States military is actually one of the nation’s largest employers. If you’re undecided about your future after high school graduation, taking the test can give you a better picture of your options in both civilian and military life.
This study guide for the ASVAB is by far the BEST. It’s very informative. It has strategies and techniques to attack the exam that will make you feel more confident. I’m very glad to have this book. Awesome Investment!! This book is by far the BEST guide to have. Its very informative and it has different techniques to tackle the ASVAB. It even includes a BONUS website that is also very helpful.

This is the most recent and updated publication of the infamous, ASVAB FOR DUMMIES. Although slightly more expensive than the original version, the ASVAB FOR DUMMIES PREMIER PLUS comes with the standard three full length practice tests and one year of online access to an additional six practice tests. You will also have access to 300 ASVAB flash cards, and the ability to create your own practice tests to hone in on your weaknesses and rise above them.
The Auto and Shop Information subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery involves questions about automobile systems and functions/malfunctions and questions about common shop tools and fasteners and their uses. Your Auto and Shop Information subtest score is used to determine various job qualifications. It is not used in determining your Armed Forces Qualification Test score. On the ASVAB for the Auto and Shop Information subtest you will have 7 minutes to answer 11 auto-related questions and 6 minutes to answer 11 shop-related questions. On the paper version of the ASVAB, you will have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions, which are usually split between auto-related questions and shop-related questions.

Since 1976, the multiple-choice ASVAB has been used for initial aptitude screening as well as MOS classification. The exam has changed since its inception. While some parts have remained, such as arithmetic reasoning and word knowledge, others like tool knowledge have been removed in favor of questions related to assembling objects. After nearly 20 years of research and development, a computer-adaptive version of the exam was implemented in 1996. The CAT-ASVAB is the first large-scale adaptive battery test to be administered in high-stakes environments like a Military Entrance Processing Station. The paper and pencil, or P&P version is still used at a variety of other military testing sites.

Don’t let the PC section of the test throw you for a loop. Unlike the individual multiple choice questions in other sections, here you will need to read a paragraph and answer several questions in a row based on that one paragraph. The people who designed this section of the exam really knew how to make sure you are able to read detailed (and often boring) documents, remember the details of what you read, understand why they’re important, and be able to pick out the key concepts they illustrate. When you read each paragraph, it’s helpful to know the kinds of questions you’ll be asked at the end. There are basically four kinds of questions to test your comprehension:


The way to prepare for this exam is study hard and then quiz yourself with plenty of practice ASVAB tests. Remember that the exam is identical for all branches, so an Army ASVAB practice test is exactly the same as an ASVAB practice test for the Navy. The most important components of the test are the ones that count towards the Armed Services Qualifications Test, or AFQT. These sections are Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Math Knowledge. For tips and strategies for success on these questions, be sure to review our article on ASVAB Test Prep.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is one of the most widely used multiple-aptitude test batteries in the world. It was originally designed to predict success in military occupations and is used today to help both those considering entering the military (mostly high school-aged students, but also anyone who is eligible to enlist) as well as those not interested in military service (who comprise the majority of current ASVAB test takers) what sort of career may be the best fit for them. Scores from the ASVAB can be used when enlisting in the military. Students interested in taking the ASVAB should check with their high school to find out when and if the ASVAB will be offered at their school. If it is not offered, students should meet with their guidance counselor to determine if it is possible to schedule a testing session in the future. There is no cost to take the ASVAB.
Barron's ASVAB is our 2nd overall prep book on our list of the best practice books. One strong point of Barron's is that the theory review and explanations are very detail-oriented and thorough. This thoroughness really helps you to absorb everything that you need to know for the exam. Learning from your mistakes is crucial, and this review guide really allows you to do just that.

The questions that have a tendency to arise rather quickly are something along the lines of “why is this test so important?” and “What is the overall purpose of this test?” Well, first it is important to define the actual test and to assess the colorful history of the test. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test (ASVAB) is a test that was officially formatted in 1968 with the intention of mentally preparing soldiers with knowledge that identifies with the following:
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