The Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score is derived from only four of the ASVAB subtests: Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Word Knowledge (WK), Mathematics Knowlege (MK), and Arithmetic Reasoning (AR). Your AFQT is based on a percentile system with scores ranging from 1 through 99. An average score of 50 means you score better than 50% of all other test takers. The AFQT score is by far the most important score for enlisted applicants since it determines whether you can join the military service of your choice or if you are even eligible to join the military.

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is more commonly known as the ASVAB Test. If you are interested in a military career, you will need to pass this challenging test in order to qualify. It is used for all branches of the military which includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard, and Coast Guard. It is also used to gauge your abilities in specific areas that may be relevant to your job assignments within the military. For more information about the exact details of this exam, check out our article titled What is the ASVAB Test?

As a general rule of thumb, anything over an 85 on the ASVAB will qualify you for nearly any position in the armed forces. But there are slight breakdowns within each score. For example, in order to qualify for Surveillance and Communications (SC) in the Army, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension all require high marks. Though scoring an 85 or above would guarantee you scored in a high enough percentile to qualify for SC.


Light is transmitted via waves of different wavelength and frequency (perceived as color). Light is refracted when it passes from one medium into another and different wavelengths of light bend at different angles.  When light is reflected from a surface the angle at which light strikes the surface is always equal to the angle at which it is reflected.

Mathematics Knowledge. This section measures one's knowledge of mathematical principles and concepts. Arithmetic, geometry, and high school level algebra will comprise most of the problems. Knowing how to factor, solve, and simplify algebraic expressions; understanding exponents, absolute values, and systems of equations and solving inequalities will be helpful. You will also encounter words problems. Test takers should know how to solve word problems by creating algebraic equations. See product recommendations for more advice.
The Auto and Shop Information subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery involves questions about automobile systems and functions/malfunctions and questions about common shop tools and fasteners and their uses. Your Auto and Shop Information subtest score is used to determine various job qualifications. It is not used in determining your Armed Forces Qualification Test score. On the ASVAB for the Auto and Shop Information subtest you will have 7 minutes to answer 11 auto-related questions and 6 minutes to answer 11 shop-related questions. On the paper version of the ASVAB, you will have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions, which are usually split between auto-related questions and shop-related questions.

After a candidate has completed the ASVAB they must wait one calendar month before retaking the exam. An additional calendar month must pass before retesting a second time. Six calendar months must pass before retaking the test a third time. The scores received from the ASVAB may be used for enlistment for up to two years from the initial test date. 


Scoring high on the ASVAB will require preparation and study. Don’t miss out on preparing for this important test — let us help prepare you for the ASVAB. Learn more about the ASVAB test, study with our test prep materials and take our practice test. Our website will give you an idea of how well you’ll score, identifies areas that you may need to work on and suggests resources and techniques that you can use. Additionally, check out the books that we recommend – these are the highest rated ASVAB preparation books available. Check out our ASVAB Study Guides. Interested in college? Check out our College Scholarships Guide, search over 20 million scholarships and grants.
Line Scores are composed of the sum of particular combinations of ASVAB subtests. These scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Line Scores are not used to determine eligibility for particular military occupations for officer candidates. Job availability for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS).
Barron's ASVAB is our 2nd overall prep book on our list of the best practice books. One strong point of Barron's is that the theory review and explanations are very detail-oriented and thorough. This thoroughness really helps you to absorb everything that you need to know for the exam. Learning from your mistakes is crucial, and this review guide really allows you to do just that.
The Arithmetic Reasoning section of the ASVAB test focuses on word problems and delivers mathematical questions and equations in a format that must be synthesized. These may not only be simple questions involving basic multiplication, but may also be as complex as completing a physics equation listed in paragraph or word-block format. When deconstructing these word problems, pay close attention to all aspects of the question, including all numbers mentioned, buzzwords, and the format of the paragraph itself. The following pointers will give you a more in-depth analysis of each component of word problems.
In complete honesty, one can say that the test identifies with an entire life's worth of knowledge. It essentially pulls from 3 different aspects. First, it draws from concrete facts that were acquired from all areas of a person's educational career. Secondly, it draws from a person’s ability to comprehend and use context clues to make assumptions. Lastly, it draws from a person’s physical/verbal skills to see if they can properly administer those more physical aspects. Overall this is why people have identified it as the “SAT on steroids.”
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