8. Use the following passage to answer questions 8 and 9. Harry went to the drugstore and purchased band-aids, pain relievers and cold medication. He also picked up two prescriptions. He then stopped by the hardware store and bought nails, screws and a first aid kit. Finally, he went to the grocery store and bought orange juice, flour and eggs. Where did Harry buy the first aid kit?
The way to prepare for this exam is study hard and then quiz yourself with plenty of practice ASVAB tests. Remember that the exam is identical for all branches, so an Army ASVAB practice test is exactly the same as an ASVAB practice test for the Navy. The most important components of the test are the ones that count towards the Armed Services Qualifications Test, or AFQT. These sections are Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Math Knowledge. For tips and strategies for success on these questions, be sure to review our article on ASVAB Test Prep.
The Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB test, is required of all people trying to enlist in the United States military service (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps) or the United States Coast Guard. This multiple-choice test is divided into eight subtests to assess individual subject area strengths and weaknesses. Passing (being admitted to the branch of service) is determined by a combination of ASVAB score and if the future enlistee has graduated from high school or has a GED (General Educational Development series of tests). Enlistees must also pass the ASVAB with a certain scores for each subtest to be eligible to obtain certain jobs within the service.
The scores from the other tests are used to determine what type of specialty you might be best suited for.  These "composite" scores (also known as line scores, MOS scores, or aptitude area scores) are calculated by adding together combinations of the different sub test standard scores. These composite scores are then used to determine which different military jobs (aka Military Occupational Specialties or MOS) may be the best fit for you.  Each branch of the military will have their own approach to these composite scores.
The Assembling Objects subtest of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is designed to measure your ability for visualizing spatial relationships. In this section of the ASVAB you will be required to view pieces of an object and then determine how those pieces fit together. If you’re asking yourself why this ability is important, the answer is because good spatial skills allow people to figure out maps and interpret graphs and technical drawings. For the Assembling Objects subtest you will 15 minutes to solve 16 problems on the CAT-ASVAB test and 16 minutes to solve 25 questions on the paper version of the ASVAB.
Education Requirements – Like the Air Force, the Navy rarely accepts recruits without a high school diploma. GED enlistments must get at least a 50 on the AFQT and they can’t have drug or illegal activity on their police records. In addition, enlistments with only a GED must have three references from prominent members of the community (police, fire, teacher, civil servant, etc.). For those who have college experience, advanced enlistment ranking as high as E-3 is available for recruits with some college credits.
The verbal expression (VE) part of the ASVAB is really important. It factors in to not only your AFQT score, but your Line Score. Line Scores are what determine your job qualifications. Your VE score is computed using adding your Word Knowledge (WK) raw score to the Paragraph Comprehension (PC) raw score. It is then converted to a scaled score ranging from 20 to 62.

Improper Fraction: With an improper fraction, the numerator is bigger than the denominator. To convert a mixed fraction to an improper fraction multiply the denominator by the whole integer part, then add this to the numerator. This is the new numerator of the converted improper fraction. The original denominator is retained. For example, with , multiply 5 by 1, and add this product to 3 to get:
A switch is a device for opening and closing an electric circuit – when the switch is open, no current flows.  Switches are categorized by the number of poles and throws they provide with the number of poles designating the number of electrical circuits the switch can control and the number of throws indicating the number of connections the switch can make between those circuits.
AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
Extra back-to-basics practice that has helped thousands of recruits to qualify for the armed forces. Thousands of military recruits need extra help to pass the ASVAB, or Armed Forces Test and here’s where they can find it! ARCO’s ASVAB Basics offers intensive practice in reading, vocabulary, and mathematics the subjects covered in the four ASVAB subtests that determine whether a recruit qualifies for enlistment. Now updated, it features: * Full-length ASVAB subtests for practice * Drills to improve basic academic skills * Complete explanatory answers.
If you’re considering joining the military, you’ll need to know about the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB. It’s often given to 11th graders, but anyone joining the military must pass it. It’s used to determine a person’s skills and aptitudes in a variety of subjects, and the results enable the military to place the person in the best possible slot for a person with that particular skill set.
The Marine Corps requires a minimum AFQT score of 32 for those with a high school diploma and a minimum score of 50 for applicants with a GED. As with the Navy, only 5 to 10 percent of each year's Marine Corps recruitment class has a GED. Like the Navy and Army, a minimum score of 50 is required to qualify for incentive programs, including enlistment bonuses, the Marine Corps College Fund and the Geographic Area of Choice Program.
My student and I like how there are videos in between. This allows him to visually see and hear about the information in a different way. It breaks up the book and makes it more interesting. I also like the setup of the book. So far, he has taken the Word Knowledge practice test after reviewing and received a score of 32/35, which seems to be a very good score. He wants to join the National Guard but did not score high enough on the ASVAB the two times he took the test previously. This study guide seems to really be helping him with the secrets and tools to achieve a higher score.
The questions that have a tendency to arise rather quickly are something along the lines of “why is this test so important?” and “What is the overall purpose of this test?” Well, first it is important to define the actual test and to assess the colorful history of the test. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test (ASVAB) is a test that was officially formatted in 1968 with the intention of mentally preparing soldiers with knowledge that identifies with the following:
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