The sections are as follows, General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and a Verbal Expression score influenced by the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension sections of the test. Those looking to join the Navy also complete a Coding Speed test.

It had sections on the mechanical portion of the ASVAB that were very helpful as well as Mathematical practices that served as a great refresher for me. The strategies were also very helpful and gave me confidence going into the test. After going through the book and taking the practice exams, I feel I was well prepared for the ASVAB test. My score almost doubled from my previous attempt at the test after using this guide.
Line Scores are used to determine if enlisted applicants are qualified to be trained in a specific military occupation. A type of line score, known as the General-Technical score, is used to determine if prospective officer candidates are qualified to join a specific branch of the military and be enrolled in officer training. Job selection for officer candidates is based on their performance in Officer Candidate School (OCS) and not on their General-Technical score.
It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.
Like other military aptitude tests, the ASVAB measures general knowledge from a wide range of categories which can make studying for it seem hopeless at times. Fortunately there are a number of books and study guides out there to help you do well and increase your score. Although this list isn't comprehensive it does include the most helpful and relevant study guides available for succeeding on the ASVAB and, by extension, allowing you to start your career serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. 
You are tested in four critical areas — Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension and Mathematics Knowledge (see below) — these scores count towards your Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) score. The AFQT score determines whether you’re qualified to enlist in the U.S. military. Your scores in the other areas of the ASVAB determine how qualified you are for certain military specialties. Score high, and your chances of getting the specialty/job you want increase. The better score you get, the better chance you have of pursuing the specialty or field that you desire.
The results of each test are shown as soon as you complete it. You’ll see what you got right and how it compares to other people who took the same test. Feedback is also visual, showing your percentile and success on each question compared to others. The answers to each ASVAB practice test question are explained as well. The free ASVAB example questions are both tools for learning and for comparing your results to your own previous attempts, and to the scores of your classmates and peers. You can use the scores as a baseline and to identify your weaknesses. With this information, it becomes easier to focus your study time and effort on areas that need improvement.

According to the ASVAB testing site, there are between eight and nine subtests, depending on which version of the ASVAB a soldier takes. On some of the ASVAB tests, the Auto and Shop subtests are combined. The subtests and their abbreviations are General Science (GS), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Electronics Information (EI), Auto Information (AI), Shop Information (SI), Mechanical Comprehension (MC). Each section has between 15 and 35 questions.

Welcome to ASVAB Practice Tests, a free website that is designed to help you with your ASVAB test prep and review. Each of our free ASVAB practice tests includes challenging practice questions along with detailed explanations. Whether you are preparing for a career in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or the Marines you will need to pass the ASVAB test. If you study for this test it will make a big difference in your final score. Get started now with our free ASVAB practice tests!
Standard scores: The battery consists of a set of 9 to 10 sub-tests, depending on whether you are taking the paper format or the computerized format of the test. The score that you receive for each of the sub-test is reported separately and the sum of these scores is reported as a standard score. If you take the paper format of the test, then the maximum total standard score that you can get is 225. If you take the CAT-ASVAB, then the highest standard score achievable is 145.
ASVAB stands for Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. It is a test that was originally established in 1968 to measure and predict the success of an applicant in various academic and occupational pursuits in the military. High school and post-secondary students and adults take the test more than one million times each year. If you’re interested in joining the military, or if you already have and would like to take a sample test, simply navigate through the ten practice test sections and take whichever tests you’d like as often as you’d like.
A switch is a device for opening and closing an electric circuit – when the switch is open, no current flows.  Switches are categorized by the number of poles and throws they provide with the number of poles designating the number of electrical circuits the switch can control and the number of throws indicating the number of connections the switch can make between those circuits.
The adaptive test is exactly what it sounds like, a test that adapts to the test taker. Questions in each section range in difficulty, and based on the test taker’s answers, the question types and difficulties adjust with each answer. This type of test allows for a greater level of accuracy in evaluating a prospect’s abilities. For the most part, correct answers beget more difficult questions while wrong answers will reduce the difficulty of proceeding questions.
ASVAB CEP test results are sent to students’ schools so they can explore career options with counselors. The scores show how well the student did on each subject, and how they compare with others who took the test. There are three composite scores in Verbal, Math, and Science and Technical skills, and the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score is also reported.

Additionally, many ASVAB practice tests have a section explaining the answer choices. It can be tempting to read the explanation and think that you now have a good understanding of the concept. However, an explanation likely only covers part of the question’s broader context. Even if the explanation makes sense, go back and investigate every concept related to the question until you’re positive you have a thorough understanding.

Every concept explanation is immediately followed by the practice problems. This really helps you a lot in checking and backtracking your weak points since you can go back and forth between the questions and the subjects. You can practice and review at the same time, a great time saver. It also helps you to be able to go back into the chapter and look up where you were wrong. Make sure to reread the section if you are missing a lot of questions in certain sections. This makes it easy to see what your secret weaknesses are.
Unlike enlisted applicants, officer candidates are judged solely on their General-Technical line score and not their AFQT score. Remember, the General-Technical score is comprised of the sum of Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, and the Arithmetic Reasoning subtests. The GT score requirement for prospective officers for each branch is detailed below. Note, the Air Force and the Navy do not use the ASVAB for officer applicants and rely on their own exams. 
The ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) is a test that will evaluate your capacity to become successful military personnel. However, the USA Military Service has a number of wings. Score requirement for each section of the Military Department is different. Hence, understanding your scores is essential, if you want to know, which department of the military you should apply to. 
The CAT-ASVAB is a computer-based exam that is only provided at Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS) for enlistment purposes. The test is customized based on the taker’s answers, so if one question is answered correctly, the next one will be more difficult. This exam is timed, although users have the option of pacing themselves throughout the exam. However, it is not possible to go back through the test and check answers or change responses after they have been submitted. The CAT-ASVAB is broken down into 10 subparts, including basics such as arithmetic and verbal skills as well as auto information, electronics, shop, and mechanical knowledge.
The Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB test, is required of all people trying to enlist in the United States military service (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps) or the United States Coast Guard. This multiple-choice test is divided into eight subtests to assess individual subject area strengths and weaknesses. Passing (being admitted to the branch of service) is determined by a combination of ASVAB score and if the future enlistee has graduated from high school or has a GED (General Educational Development series of tests). Enlistees must also pass the ASVAB with a certain scores for each subtest to be eligible to obtain certain jobs within the service.
The inverse of an exponent is the root which is indicated by a radical sign √.  A root consists of a radicand which is the number for which you’re finding the root and an index indicating which root you’re finding.  For example, in 3√8 the number 8 is the radicand and the number 3 is the root.  (A radical sign with no specified index is assumed to have an index of 2.)

I have not read up too much on how scoring works, but I just finished A practice ASVAB test, and scored 136 of 225, was just wondering what rank that would put me at in the army?, I have been thinking long about the idea of joining, the only thing that holds me back from making the descision to join is my lack of education, (dropped out) but plan to get my GED as soon as possible. PS. I’m only 17yrs young. But my parents and I have agreed that they would consent.
Again, the ASVAB is a wide-ranging exam covering many different areas. The designers of ASVAB practice tests, at least the high quality ones, know this and have spent time researching past tests to come up with practice tests that feature questions covering areas commonly tested for on the real exam. Thus, taking practice tests is a great way to focus on the material that matters most and avoid wasting your time studying content that likely won’t be on the test.
This is the most recent and updated publication of the infamous, ASVAB FOR DUMMIES. Although slightly more expensive than the original version, the ASVAB FOR DUMMIES PREMIER PLUS comes with the standard three full length practice tests and one year of online access to an additional six practice tests. You will also have access to 300 ASVAB flash cards, and the ability to create your own practice tests to hone in on your weaknesses and rise above them.
The test is part of the larger ASVAB Career Exploration Program. The Program uses the test to help students identify both their interests as well as their strengths in three skills areas (verbal, math, and science and technical skills). Based on a student's skill levels, information is provided about more than 400 occupations in order to enable students and parents to judge their potential success in areas that interest them the most. Schools that may be facing budget cuts or finding themselves with limited resources devoted to career counseling are encouraged to find out whether using the ASVAB Program would be useful, as the testing and career development services are free of charge.
The ASVAB Career Exploration Program (CEP) , takes approximately three hours, covers eight subjects and is composed of 200 questions. The ASVAB CEP is currently a pen and paper test. If it is offered by their school, high school students can take the ASVAB CEP test in grades 10, 11 and 12. They can only take it at the high school they attend, unless special arrangements are made.
×