Note: Active duty Marines must get permission in writing from the Commandant of the Marine Corps before taking the ASVAB (ATTN: HQ Marine Corps, Marsh Center, Manpower and Reserve Affairs (MPP), 3280 Russell Road, Quantico, VA 22134-5103). Marine Corps Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) members and Marine Corps reservists do not need the Commandant’s permission before ASVAB testing at a MEPS. If any military personnel, not including those in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR), tests at a MET site and not a MEPS, the test will be invalidated.
Tests are administered at participating schools. Neither schools nor students incur any costs for taking the ASVAB or using the Career Exploration Program. A test administrator is provided for every testing session and that person has no additional recruitment responsibilities. Various accommodations are available for the ASVAB, such as having questions read aloud, providing extra time, and other accommodations. School staff members are responsible, however, for tests that are administered with accommodations because test administrators are only able to administer the ASVAB by following the standardized procedure. If the test is being used for enlisting, only scores obtained during standardized test sessions (with no accommodations) can be used.
Batteries can be connected in series to provide voltage equal to the sum of their individual voltages with a current equal to the current that a single battery produces.  Connect batteries in parallel to provide current equal to the sum of their individual currents with a voltage equal to the voltage that a single battery produces.  To increase both voltage and current, connect batteries in a series-parallel configuration.

Line scores, which are also known as composite scores, may be used to determine if an applicant would be a good fit for specific careers in a branch of the military. For example, an acceptable Skilled Technical (ST) score may be required for some positions in the Army. The ST score is determined by an individual's scores on the Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), General Science (GS), Paragraph Comprehension (PC) and Word Knowledge (WK) subtests of the ASVAB.


The adaptive test is exactly what it sounds like, a test that adapts to the test taker. Questions in each section range in difficulty, and based on the test taker’s answers, the question types and difficulties adjust with each answer. This type of test allows for a greater level of accuracy in evaluating a prospect’s abilities. For the most part, correct answers beget more difficult questions while wrong answers will reduce the difficulty of proceeding questions.

Mathematics Knowledge. This section measures one's knowledge of mathematical principles and concepts. Arithmetic, geometry, and high school level algebra will comprise most of the problems. Knowing how to factor, solve, and simplify algebraic expressions; understanding exponents, absolute values, and systems of equations and solving inequalities will be helpful. You will also encounter words problems. Test takers should know how to solve word problems by creating algebraic equations. See product recommendations for more advice.
A whopping 91% of the reviewers of this ASVAB study guide on Amazon gave it five stars. The other 9%? Four stars. If you can’t trust Amazon reviewers, who can you trust? The beauty of this simply titled study guide is in the depth of explanations in how the answers are derived, particularly in the mathematics sections where the authors go to great lengths to illustrate the more complex questions.
It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.
Extra back-to-basics practice that has helped thousands of recruits to qualify for the armed forces. Thousands of military recruits need extra help to pass the ASVAB, or Armed Forces Test and here’s where they can find it! ARCO’s ASVAB Basics offers intensive practice in reading, vocabulary, and mathematics the subjects covered in the four ASVAB subtests that determine whether a recruit qualifies for enlistment. Now updated, it features: * Full-length ASVAB subtests for practice * Drills to improve basic academic skills * Complete explanatory answers.
Cells replicate by mitosis in which a cell duplicates its chromosomes and then splits in two resulting in both cells receiving a set of chromosomes that perfectly matches the parent cell or through meiosis which reduces the number of chromosomes in the parent cell by half and produces four gamete cells. This process is required to produce egg and sperm cells for sexual reproduction.

The Auto and Shop Information section of the ASVAB test measures your knowledge of automobile technology and basic repairs. The shop questions are about basic wood and metals. For example, you will encounter questions such as “Shock absorbers on a car connect the axle to the: wheel, chassis, drive shaft, or exhaust pipe?” You may be asked what sanding blocks are used for, followed by the following choices: preventing high spots and ridges on sanded surfaces, preventing dirt from collecting on the sandpaper, stretching the length of sandpaper, or prolonging the use of the sandpaper. The CAT-ASVAB test has two parts: the first part covering automotive material asks 11 questions in 7 minutes; the 11 shop information questions are allotted 6 minutes. The paper-and-pencil version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
This advice, though well-intentioned, doesn’t address the needs of some new recruits who are interested in specific career fields but are worried about their test performance-especially in areas related to math comprehension. Potential recruits who feel deficient in math, language, or science skills should have a frank conversation with their recruiter to discuss possible refresher study or even supplemental classes in any self-perceived “problem areas” before taking the test.
Education Requirements – More people are able to enlist in the Army with only a GED, as opposed to a high school diploma, than any other military branch. Some recruitment years have allowed 15% of recruits to enter without a high school diploma. On the up side, just like the Air Force, if a recruit has college credits under their belt then the Army allows the recruit to enter with a higher enlistment rank! The Army allows recruits with a college degree to enter with a rank as high as E-4, which is higher than the Air Force’s E-3 rank for recruits with only some college credits.
One flaw of this review guide is that the summary is not as comprehensive as other prep guides. At only 324 Pages, this prep book does not have enough length to meticulously go through all of the topics. If you are looking for an in-depth rundown you may need to supplement this prep book with another review guide. If you just need a quick overview, however, this guide may be perfect for you.

A solution is a uniform stable mixture of a solute that’s been dissolved into a solvent. There is a limit to the amount of solute that can be dissolved by a solvent at a given temperature and this limit is called the saturation point. Solvents can be supersaturated with a solute which results in an unstable solution that will precipitate when disturbed causing the excess solute to settle out of the solution.
Education Requirements – Recruits without a high school diploma are practically ineligible to enlist. The Marine Corps do not allow more than 5% of recruits to enlist without a high school diploma, and those recruits must have a GED. Those with only a GED must score at least a 50 on the AFQT to be considered. As with the other branches, the Marine Corps provides advanced enlistment rank for recruits that have some college experience (i.e. credits). However, the Marines are less generous to recruits with some college credit as they only allow the maximum advanced rank of E-2 upon enlistment.
There are nine sections on the exam: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects, and Verbal Expression. The time limits for each section range from 10 – 36 minutes; the entire exam takes three hours.
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The AFQT has been used in non-military settings as a proxy measure of intelligence, for example, in Herrnstein & Murray's book The Bell Curve. Because of the test's significance both inside and outside military settings, it is important to examine what the test measures, i.e. to evaluate the construct validity of the AFQT. Kaufman's 2010 review stated that David Marks (2010) scanned the literature for datasets containing test estimates for populations or groups taking both the AFQT and tests of literacy. One study on nine groups of soldiers differing in job and reading ability found a correlation of .96 between the AFQT and reading achievement (Sticht, Caylor, Kern, & Fox, 1972). Another study showed significant improvements among Black and Hispanic populations in their AFQT scores between 1980 and 1992 while Whites only showed a slight decrement (Kilburn, Hanser, & Klerman, 1998). Another study obtained reading scores for 17-year olds for those same ethnic groups and dates (Campbell et al., 2000) and found a correlation of .997 between reading scores and AFQT scores. This nearly perfect correlation was based on six pairs of data points from six independent population samples evaluated by two separate groups of investigators. According to Marks, "On the basis of the studies summarized here, there can be little doubt that the Armed Forces Qualifications Test is a measure of literacy." However, it is important to note that AFQT has been shown to correlate more highly with classic IQ tests than they do with one another, and that the "crystallized" intelligence measured by AFQT is measured very similarly by Wechsler, in particular.[8]
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